bchnode.solomining.io - Anonymous BCHNODE Solo Mining

Does Monero Have a Serious Centralized Mining Problem?

Does Monero Have a Serious Centralized Mining Problem? submitted by TheFuzzStone to Monero [link] [comments]

Mining and Dogecoin - Some FAQs

Hey shibes,
I see a lot of posts about mining lately and questions about the core wallet and how to mine with it, so here are some facts!
Feel free to add information to that thread or correct me if I did any mistake.

You downloaded the core wallet

Great! After a decade it probably synced and now you are wondering how to get coins? Bad news: You don't get coins by running your wallet, even running it as a full node. Check what a full node is here.
Maybe you thought so, because you saw a very old screenshot of a wallet, like this (Version 1.2). This version had a "Dig" tab where you can enter your mining configuration. The current version doesn't have this anymore, probably because it doesn't make sense anymore.

You downloaded a GPU/CPU miner

Nice! You did it, even your antivirus system probably went postal and you started covering all your webcams... But here is the bad news again: Since people are using ASIC miners, you just can't compete with your CPU hardware anymore. Even with your more advanced GPU you will have a hard time. The hashrate is too high for a desktop PC to compete with them. The blocks should be mined every 1 minute (or so) and that's causing the difficulty to go up - and we are out... So definitly check what is your hashrate while you are mining, you would need about 1.5 MH/s to make 1 Doge in 24 hours!

Mining Doge

Let us start with a quote:
"Dogecoin Core 1.8 introduces AuxPoW from block 371,337. AuxPoW is a technology which enables miners to submit work done while mining other coins, as work on the Dogecoin block chain."
- langerhans
What does this mean? You could waste your hashrate only on the Dogecoin chain, probably find never a block, but when, you only receive about 10.000 Dogecoins, currently worth about $25. Or you could apply your hashrate to LTC and Doge (and probably even more) at the same time. Your change of solving the block (finding the nonce) is your hashrate divided by the hashrat in sum - and this is about the same for Doge and LTC. This means you will always want to submit your work to all chains available!

Mining solo versus pool

So let's face it - mining solo won't get you anywhere, so let's mine on a pool! If you have a really bad Hashrate, please consider that: Often you need about $1 or $2 worth of crypto to receive a payout (without fees). This means, you have to get there. With 100 MH/s on prohashing, it takes about 6 days, running 24/7 to get to that threshold. Now you can do the math... 1 MH/s = 1000 KH/s, if you are below 1 MH/s, you probably won't have fun.

Buying an ASIC

You found an old BTC USB-miner with 24 GH/s (1 GH/s = 1000 MH/s) for $80 bucks - next stop lambo!? Sorry, bad news again, this hashrate is for SHA-256! If you want to mine LTC/Doge you will need a miner using scrypt with quite lower numbers on the hashrate per second, so don't fall for that. Often when you have a big miner (= also loud), you get more Hashrate per $ spent on the miner, but most will still run on a operational loss, because the electricity is too expensive and the miners will be outdated soon again. Leading me to my next point...

Making profit

You won't make money running your miner. Just do the math: What if you would have bougth a miner 1 year ago? Substract costs for electricity and then compare to: What if you just have bought coins. In most cases you would have a greater profit by just buying coins, maybe even with a "stable" coin like Doges.

Cloud Mining

Okay, this was a lot of text and you are still on the hook? Maybe you are desperated enough to invest in some cloud mining contract... But this isn't a good idea either, because most of such contracts are scams based on a ponzi scheme. You often can spot them easy, because they guarantee way to high profits, or they fake payouts that never happened, etc.
Just a thought: If someone in a subway says to you: Give me $1 and lets meet in one year, right here and I give you $54,211,841, you wouldn't trust him and if some mining contract says they will give you 5% a day it is basically the same.
Also rember the merged mining part. Nobody would offer you to mine Doges, they would offer you to buy a hashrate for scrypt that will apply on multiple chains.

Alternative coins

Maybe try to mine a coin where you don't have ASICs yet, like Monero and exchange them to Doge. If somebody already tried this - feel free to add your thoughts!

Folding at Home (Doge)

Some people say folding at home (FAH - https://www.dogecoinfah.com/) still the best. I just installed the tool and it says I would make 69.852 points a day, running on medium power what equates to 8 Doges. It is easy, it was fun, but it isn't much.
Thanks for reading
_nformant
submitted by _nformant to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Introduction Thread + Plans for the future!

Hey everyone! Welcome to the ABCmint (Or ABC, or Abcardo) subreddit! Please feel free to introduce yourselves below. I wrote a few questions to get the creative juices flowing.
Quick intro here: I'm u/seekingomega, and I've been mining ABCmint for roughly 2 years now (give or take).
On my ABC journey, I've made a few YouTube videos about the project, created a (pretty crappy) block explorer, and have had the pleasure of meeting others who have an interest in PQC blockchains as well.
To answer my own questions...
Plans for the future: I'll start scouring the web for ABC related news that pops up, and share them on this subreddit.
Additionally, I'd like to add some good PQC readings. If you have articles or books, please share them in a comment!
submitted by seekingomega to ABCMint [link] [comments]

my moon hypothesis

I think monero's gonna goto the moon. Here's the reason why.

First, the general market seems to be in an upswing... this will naturally increase the price of monero (along with other alts). This rise in price will once again cause an increase in interest from outside of the crypto space.
For a lot of people new to the space, the idea of mining is attractive and fascinating. You can print money with your computer. What? Full stop. I remember reading a while ago that this component of nakamoto consensus has an allure because it is akin to alchemy, and apparently human culture has always had a fascination with alchemy.
So, these newcomers will think (as many do) "I should get into mining". They may do some research and discover that bitcoin mining is dead. Eventually they'll come across the fact that Monero is still CPU mineable. And at these bubble run prices, it could probably even turn a profit! So they'll set their PC to mine. Or maybe buy another PC.
And they'll mine.
And they'll read more about monero. They'll become fascinated with why (and how) monero is a privacy coin. They'll become fascinated with why (and how) monero has chosen to have a CPU-bound PoW. They'll probably also come across the tail emission, and why Monero has one, which will then get them reading about base layer scaling.
And they'll mine some more.
And they'll read some more about monero. They'll come across this notion of fungibility. They'll perhaps start to understand how blockchains work, and how consensus protocols work, and how base-layer protocol is the most important protocol for a cryptocurrency.
Probably after mining for a month, watching the price of monero increase and their pooled mining payout threshold *never* coming close to hitting, and all the while reading this or that about monero, they'll say "well, the only way I'm gonna get a good lot of this Monero is to buy some". And hopefully they'll be able to navigate the morass of AML/KYC(M - o - U - s - E) and get their hands on some.
And thats demand. On the buy side.
And where's the pressure from the sell side? Monero's emission just went under 2 xmr a block. And this new emission isn't going to mining farms with bottom lines to cover, so they always need to sell to keep the lights on.
No, its going to people like this, 500 khs bunch of workers with 1.7 to 7 kh/s per worker. Probably a sysadmin somewhere that has idle CPUs that they've decided to mine with.
or this glorious bastard, with 2.2 Mh/s. Their overall activity has a wave pattern, and the worker distribution seems like contemporary intel / amd PCs.
And then you get the ones like this, 11 Mh/s peak with a glorious wave pattern. This one is so cyclical you can't see the online workers because they seem to turn off every day at the same time. Or they have an agreement with nanopool to hide their worker details. But the waves are still visible.
And its also going to solo miners, like this guy. Roughly 13% of the found blocks aren't accounted for via the major pool aggregation website. I don't wanna make up numbers here, but what if that 13% is all just lucky solo miners?
There's ~1440 monero printed every day at this point. How much of that is going straight to market? Based on the fundamental differences in the monero mining ecosystem, I'd bet that more of the newly minted coin is going straight into cold, deep storage.
Of course, the markets are all just manipulated nonsense, so it really just depends on when some whale decides to market buy a bajillion xmr for the lulz.
submitted by gingeropolous to xmrtrader [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Guide
Happy Mining!

All available XRC pools can be found on MiningPoolStats

Bitcoin Rhodium Mining Hardware

Baikal Giant+: 1.6 GH/s
Baikal Quad Cube: 1.2 GH/s
Baikal Giant: 900 MH/s
Baikal Quadruple Mini Miner: 600 MH/s
Baikal Miner Cube: 300 MH/s
Baikal Mini Miner: 150 MH/s

Mining Setup

To mine Bitcoin Rhodium you need to set up an XRC wallet and configure your miner of choice. You can choose between Web wallet, Electrum-XRC or Magnum wallet. To set up a web wallet please visit wallet.bitcoinrh.org. Or download and install Electrum-XRC wallet (recommended) for Windows, Linux and MacOS.
Web wallet: wallet.bitcoinrh.org
Electrum-XRC wallet: electrum.bitcoinrh.org
Magnum wallet: https://magnumwallet.co

Sign up for XRC web wallet if not yet done so

  1. Create an account, with your username, password and secure question.
  2. Sign in and click “Create Wallet”.
  3. Set up a strong transaction password. Make sure you store it securely in a secure password manager of choice.
  4. Copy the seed somewhere safe. It’d be a good idea to write seed on a hardcopy and keep it safe.
  5. Paste it to confirm you got it right.
  6. Grab an address for the mining step. Your wallet is now ready to mine XRC.

Instructions for mining XRC on the official pool

Pool link: poolcore.bitcoinrh.org
  1. Any miner that supports X13 will be able to mine XRC. We have a few examples below of miners that are well tested with Bitcoin Rhodium network.
  2. For any miner, configure the miner to point to:
(0–0.8 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061
(0.8–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
with your XRC address as username and x as password. You don’t need to open an account on pool. You will be mining to XRC address and mined coins will be transferred to your wallet
after blocks reach 10 block maturity
after you mined up minimal amount of coins (currently 0.1 XRC)
sometimes mined blocks could get rejected by network (orphaned) after they were counted as valid blocks. This is normal network behavior to follow longest chain
  1. http://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org is used to follow your miner and network statistics.

CPU Miner-Multi

Source: https://github.com/tpruvot/cpuminer-multi
Sample configuration with CPU Miner tested on UBUNTU.
{
“url” : “stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3061”, “user” : “YOUR XRC ADDRESS”,
“pass” : “x”,
“algo” : “x13”, “threads” : 1,
“cpu-priority” : 5,
“cpu-affinity” : 1, “benchmark” : false, “debug” : true, “protocol”: true, “show-diff”: true, “quiet” : false
}
Command to run your CPUMiner: cpuminer -c cpuminer.json

SGMiner (ATI GPU)

SGMiner is a GPU-based mine: https://github.com/nicehash/sgminereleases
The configuration below was tested on Windows:
setx GPU_FORCE_64BIT_PTR 0
setx GPU_MAX_HEAP_SIZE 100
setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
setx GPU_SINGLE_ALLOC_PERCENT 100
cd C:\Software\sgminer-5.6.1-nicehash-51-windowsamd64 sgminer.exe
— gpu-platform 1 — algorithm x13mod -url stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh. org:3062 — pool-user — userpass :x — auto-fan — temp-target 70 — temp-over- heat 82 — temp-cutoff 85 — gpu-fan 65–85 — log-file log.txt — no-adl — no-extra- nonce -P –T

CCMiner (NVIDIA GPU)

CCMiner is a GPU-based miner (NVIDIA)
Command to run your CCMINER:
ccminer-x64.exe -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062 -O :without -D — show-diff

Baikal miner

Settings: Url:
(0–2 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3062
(3–4 GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3063
(5+ GH/s) stratum+tcp://poolcore.bitcoinrh.org:3064
Algo: x13User: your XRC receiving address (make sure you set 2 distinct addresses for each hashing board)
Pass: x
Extranonce: leave off Priority set to 0 and 1
Once pool stratum address and your wallet as user are set up you should see your miner mining against XRC pool. When miner is working the status column is green. The pool and miner are incorrectly configured now as status says “Dead” highlighted in red.

Instructions for mining XRC on BSOD pool

Pool link: bsod.pw/en/pool/dashboard/XRC/
Use this code for your miner: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig
BSOD pool allows both solo and party mining.
For solo mining use code: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=solo And for party mining use: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://pool.bsod.pw:2582 -u WALLET.rig -p m=party.yourpassword
NOTICE: You can use us for North America and asia for Asia instead of euin your .bat file or config.
You can also use BSOD pool’s monitor app for Android and iOS.

Instructions for mining XRC on ZERGPOOL

Zergpool offers low fees (just 0.5%) and also SOLO and PARTY mining with no extra fees.
To mine XRC on Zergpool use this command lines for your miner:
Regular: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC Solo: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=solo Party: -a x13 -o stratum+tcp://x13.mine.zergpool.com:3633 -u -p c=XRC,mc=XRC,m=party
Use your coin wallet address as username in mining software. Specify c=SYMBOL as password to identify payout wallet coin, and the same coin in mc=SYMBOL to specify mining coin.
For more information and support please visit http://zergpool.com
Notice that when there are more pools mining XRC in different geographic/availability locations choose the nearest to you as lowest priority and then add desirable fall back pool options in different geographic locations or pools. This is useful when one pool experiences issues, to fall back to different pool in Bitcoin Rhodium network.

Calculate your Bitcoin Rhodium mining profitability

WhatToMine: https://whattomine.com/coins/317-xrc-x13
CoinCalculators: https://www.coincalculators.io/coin/bitcoin-rhodium

Feel free to ask questions in Discord community. There are lots of helpful people around the world watching XRC 24x7.

Bitcoin Rhodium Dev Team
submitted by BitcoinRh to BitcoinRhodium [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining Profitability: How Long Does it Take to Mine One Bitcoin in 2019?

When it comes to Bitcoin (BTC) mining, the major questions on people’s minds are “how profitable is Bitcoin mining” and “how long would it take to mine one Bitcoin?” To answer these questions, we need to take an in-depth look at the current state of the Bitcoin mining industry — and how it has changed — over the last several years.
Bitcoin mining is, essentially, the process of participating in Bitcoin’s underlying security mechanism — known as proof-of-work — to help secure the Bitcoin blockchain. In return, participants receive compensation in bitcoins (BTC).
When you participate in Bitcoin mining, you are essentially searching for blocks by crunching complex cryptographic challenges using your mining hardware. Once a block is discovered, new transactions are recorded and verified within the block and the block discoverer receives the block rewards — currently set at 12.5 BTC — as well as the transactions fees for the transactions included within the block.
Once the maximum supply of 21 million Bitcoins has been mined, no further Bitcoins will ever come into existence. This property makes Bitcoin deflationary, something which many argue will inevitably increase the value of each Bitcoin unit as it becomes more scarce due to increased global adoption.
The limited supply of Bitcoin is also one of the reasons why Bitcoin mining has become so popular. In previous years, Bitcoin mining proved to be a lucrative investment option — netting miners with several fold returns on their investment with relatively little effort.
bitcoin mining hardware
Mining Hardware
The mining hardware you choose will mostly depend on your circumstances — in terms of budget, location and electricity costs. Since the amount of hashing power you can dedicate to the mining process is directly correlated with how much Bitcoin you will mine per day, it is wise to ensure your hardware is still competitive in 2019.
Bitcoin uses SHA256 as its mining algorithm. Because of this, only hardware compatible with this algorithm can be used to mine Bitcoin. Although it is technically possible to mine Bitcoin on your current computer hardware — using your CPU or GPU — this will almost certainly not generate a positive return on your investment and you may end up damaging your device.
The most cost-effective way to mine Bitcoin in 2019 is using application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) mining hardware. These are specially-designed machines that offer much higher performance per watt than typical computers and have been an absolutely essential purchase for anybody looking to get into Bitcoin mining since the first Avalon ASICs were shipped in 2013.
When it comes to selecting Bitcoin mining hardware, there are several main parameters to consider — though the importance of each of these may vary based on personal circumstances and budget.
Performance per Watt
When it comes to Bitcoin mining, performance per watt is a measure of how many gigahashes per watt a machine is capable of and is, hence, a simple measure of its efficiency. Since electricity costs are likely to be one of the largest expenses when mining Bitcoin, it is usually a good idea to ensure that you are getting good performance per watt out of your hardware.
Ideally, your mining hardware would be highly efficient, allowing it to mine Bitcoin with lower energy requirements — though this will need to be balanced with acquisition costs, as often the most efficient hardware is also the most expensive. This means it may take longer to see a return on investment.
In countries with cheap electricity, performance per watt is often less of a concern than acquisition costs and price-performance ratio. In most countries, operating outdated mining hardware is typically cost prohibitive, as energy costs outweigh the income generated by the mining equipment.
However, this may not be the case for those operating in countries with extremely cheap electricity — such as Kuwait and Venezuela — as even older equipment can still be profitable. Similarly, miners with a free energy surplus, such as from wind or solar electric generators, can benefit from the minimal gains offered by still running outdated hardware.
Longevity
The lifetime of mining hardware also plays a critical role in determining how profitable your mining venture will be. It’s always a good idea to do whatever possible to ensure it runs as smoothly as possible.
Since mining equipment tends to run at a full (or almost full) load for extended periods, they also tend to break down and fail more frequently than most electronics — which can seriously damage your profitability. Equipment failure is even more common when purchasing second-hand equipment. Since warranty claims are often challenging, it can often take a long time to receive a warranty replacement.
Price-Performance Ratio
In many cases, one of the major criteria used to select mining hardware is the price-performance ratio — a measure of how much performance a machine outputs per unit price. In the case of cryptocurrency mining hardware, this is commonly expressed as gigahashes per dollar or GH/$.
Under ideal circumstances, the mining hardware would have a high price-performance ratio, ensuring you get a lot of bang for your buck. However, this must also be considered in combination with the acquisition costs and the expected lifetime of the machine — since the absolute most powerful machines are not always the cheapest or the most energy efficient.
Acquisition Costs
Acquisition costs are almost always the biggest barrier to entry for most Bitcoin miners since most top-end mining hardware costs several thousand dollars. This problem is further compounded by the fact that many hardware manufacturers offer discounts for bulk purchases, allowing those with deeper pockets to achieve a better price-performance ratio.
Acquisition costs include all the costs involved in purchasing any mining equipment, including hardware costs, shipping costs, import duties, and any further costs. For example, many ASIC miners do not include a power supply — which can be another considerable expense, since the 1,000W+ power supplies usually required tend to cost several hundred dollars alone.
Ensuring your equipment runs smoothly can also add in additional costs, such as cooling and maintenance expenses. In addition, some miners may want to invest in uninterruptible power supplies to ensure their hardware keeps running — even if the power fails temporarily.
asic mining
Current Generation Hardware
One of the most recent additions to the Bitcoin mining hardware market is the Ebang Ebit E11++, which was released in October 2018. Using a 10nm fabrication process for its processors, the Ebit E11++ is able to achieve one of the highest hash rates on the market at 44TH/s.
In terms of efficiency, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is arguably the best on the market, offering 44TH/s of hash rate while drawing just 1,980W of power, offering 22.2GH/W performance. However, as of writing, the Ebang Ebit E11++ is out of stock until March 31, 2019 — while its price of $2,024 (excluding shipping) may make it prohibitively expensive for those first getting involved with Bitcoin mining.
Another popular choice is the ASICminer 8 Nano, a machine released in October 2018 that offers 44TH/s for $3,900 excluding shipping. The ASICminer 8 Nano draws 2,100W of power, giving it an efficiency of almost 21GH/W — slightly lower than the Ebit E11++ while costing almost double the price. However, unlike the E11++, the 8 Nano is actually in stock and available to purchase.
ASICminer also offers the 8 Nano Pro, a machine launched in mid-2018 that offers 80 TH/s of hash rate for $9,500 (excluding shipping). However, unlike the Ebit E11++ and 8 Nano, the minimum order quantity for the 8 Nano Pro is curiously set at five, meaning you will need to lay out a minimum of $47,500 in order to actually get your hands on one (or five).
While the 8 Nano Pro doesn’t offer the same performance per watt as the Ebit E11+ or AICMiner 8 Nano, it is one of the quieter miners on this list, making it more suitable for a home or office environment. That being said, the ASICminer 8 Nano Pro is easily the most expensive miner per TH on this list — costing a whopping $118.75/TH, compared to the $46/TH offered by the E11++ and $88.64 offered by the 8 Nano.
The latest hardware on this list is the Innosilicon T3 43T, which is currently available for pre-order at $2,279, and estimated to ship in March 2019. Offering 43TH/s of performance at 2,100W, the T3 43T comes in at an efficiency of 20.4GH/W, which is around 10 percent less energy efficient than the Ebit E11++.
The T3 43T also has a minimum order quantity of three units, making the minimum acquisition cost $6837 + shipping for preorders. All in all, the T3 43T is more costly and less efficient than the E11++ but may arrive slightly earlier since Ebang will not ship the E11++ units until at least end March 29, 2019.
Finally, this list would not be complete without including Bitmain’s latest offering, the Antminer S15-28TH/s, which — as its name suggests — offers 28TH/s of hash power while drawing just under 1600W at the wall. The Antminer S15 is one of the only SHA256 miners to use 7nm processors, making it somewhat smaller than some of the other devices on this list.
Like most pieces of top-end Bitcoin mining hardware, the Antminer S15 27TH/s model is currently sold out, with current orders not shipping until mid-February 2019. However, the S15 is offered at a significantly lower price than many of its competitors at just $1020 (excluding shipping), with no minimum quantity restriction. At these rates, the Antminer comes in at just $37.78/TH — though its energy efficiency is a much less impressive 17.5GH/W.
Mining Hardware Mining Hardware Comparison
Performance (GH/W) Price Performance Ratio ($/TH)
Ebang Ebit E11++ 22.2GH/W $46/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano 21GH/W $88.64/TH
ASICminer 8 Nano Pro 19GH/W $118.75/TH
Innosilicon T3 43T 20.4GH/W $53/TH
Antminer S15-28TH/s 17.5GH/W $37.78/TH
How To Select a Good Mining Pool
Mining pools are platforms that allow miners to pool their resources together to achieve a higher collective hash rate — which, in turn, allows the collective to mine more blocks than they would be able to achieve alone.
Typically, these mining pools will distribute block rewards to contributing miners based on the proportion of the hash rate they supply. If a pool contributing a total of 20 TH/s of hash rate successfully mines the next block, a user responsible for 10 percent of this hash rate will receive 10 percent of the 12.5 BTC reward.
Pools essentially allow smaller miners to compete with large private mining organizations by ensuring that the collective hash rate is high enough to successfully mine blocks on regular basis. Without operating through a mining pool, many miners would be unlikely to discover any blocks at all — due to only contributing a tiny fraction of the overall Bitcoin hash rate.
While it is quite possible to be successful mining without a pool, this typically requires an extremely large mining operation and is usually not recommended — unless you have enough hash rate to mine blocks on a regular basis.
Although it is technically possible to discover blocks mining solo and keep the entire 12.5 BTC reward for yourself, the odds of this actually occurring are practically zero — making pool collaboration practically the only way to compete in 2019 and beyond.
Selecting the best pool for you can be a challenging job since the vast majority of pools are quite similar and offer similar features and comparable fees. Because of this, we have broken down the qualities you should be looking for in a new pool into four categories; reputation, hash rate, pool fees, and usability/features:
Reputation
The reputation of a pool is one of the most important factors in selecting the pool that is best for you. Well-reputed pools will tend to be much larger than newer or less well-established pools since few pools with a poor reputation can stand the test of time.
Well-reputed pools also tend to be more transparent about their operation, many of which provide tools to ensure that each user is getting the correct reward based on the hash rate contributed. By using only pools with a great reputation, you also ensure your hash rate is not being used for nefarious purposes — such as powering a 51 percent attack.
When comparing a list of pools that appear suitable for you, it is a wise move to read their user reviews before making your choice — ensuring you don’t end up mining at a pool that steals your hard-fought earnings.
Hash Rate
When it comes to mining Bitcoin, the probability of discovering the next block is directly related to the amount of hashing power you contribute to the network. Because of this, one of the major features you should be considering when selecting your pool is its total hash rate — which is often closely related to the proportion of new blocks mined by the pool
Since the total hash rate of a pool is directly related to how quickly it discovers new blocks, this means the largest pools tend to discover a relative majority of blocks — leading to more regular rewards. However, the very largest pools also tend the have higher fees but often make up for this with sheer success and additional features.
Sometimes, some of the largest pools have a minimum hash rate requirement ù leaving some of the smaller miners left out of the loop. Although smaller pools typically have more relaxed requirements with reduced performance thresholds, these pools may be only slightly more profitable than mining solo.
Pool Fees
When choosing a suitable pool, typically one of the major considerations is its fees. Typically, most pools will charge a small fee that is deducted from your earnings and is usually around 1-2 percent — but sometimes slightly lower or higher.
There are also pools that offer 0 percent fees. However, these are often much smaller than the major pools and tend to make their money in a different way — such as through monthly subscriptions or donations.
Ideally, you will choose the pool that offers the best balance of fees to other features. Usually, the pool with the absolute lowest fees is not the best choice. Additionally, pools with the lowest fees often have the highest withdrawal minimums — making pool hopping uneconomical for most.
Usability and Features
When first starting out with Bitcoin mining, learning how to set up a pool and navigating through the settings can be a challenge. Because of this, several pools target their services to newer users by offering a simple to navigate user interface and providing detailed learning resources and prompt customer support.
However, for more experienced miners, simple pools don’t tend to offer a variety of features needed to maximize profitability. For example, although many mining pools focus their entire hash rate towards mining a single cryptocurrency, some are large enough to offer additional options — allowing users to mine other SHA256 coins such as Bitcoin Cash (BCH) or Fantom if they choose.
These pools are technically more challenging to use and mostly designed for those familiar with mining, happy to hop from coin to coin mining whichever is most profitable at the time. There are even some exchanges that automatically direct their combined hash rate at the most profitable cryptocurrency — taking the guesswork out of the equation.
bitcoin mining pool
Best Mining Pools for 2019
The Bitcoin mining pool industry has a large number of players, but the vast majority of the Bitcoin hash rate is concentrated within just a few pools. Currently, there are dozens of suitable pools to choose from — but we have selected just a few of the best to help get you started on your journey.
Slushpool was the first Bitcoin mining pool released, being launched way back in 2010 under the name “Bitcoin Pooled Mining Server.” Since then, Slushpool has grown into one of the most popular pools around — currently accounting for just under 10 percent of the total Bitcoin hash rate.
Although Slushpool isn’t one of the very largest pools, it does offer a newbie-friendly interface alongside more advanced features for those that need them. The pool has moderately high fees of 2 percent but offers servers in several countries — including the U.S., Europe, China, and Japan — giving it a good balance of fees to features.
BTC.com is another potential candidate for your pool and currently stands as the largest public Bitcoin mining pool. It is responsible for mining around 17 percent of new blocks. Being the largest public mining pool provides users with a sense of security, ensuring blocks are mined regularly and a stable income is made.
Image courtesy of Blockchain.info.
BTC.com is owned by Bitmain, a company that manufacturers mining hardware, and charges a 1.5 percent fees — placing it squarely in the middle-tier in terms of fees. Unlike other platforms, BTC.com uses its own payment structure known as FPPS (Full Pay Per Share), which means miners also receive a share of the transaction fees included within mined blocks — making it slightly more profitable than standard payment per share (PPS) pools.
Another great option is Antpool, a mining pool that supports mining services for 10 different cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Litecoin (LTC) and Ethereum (ETH). AntPool frequently trades places with BTC.com as the largest Bitcoin mining pool. However, as of this writing, it occupies the title of the third-largest public mining pool.
What sets Antpool apart from other pools is the ability to choose your own fee system — including PPS, PPS+, and PPLNS. If you choose PPLNS, using Antpool is free but you will not receive any transaction fees from any blocks mined. Antpool also offers regular payouts and has a low minimum payout of just 0.001 BTC, making it suitable for smaller miners.
Last on the list of the best Bitcoin mining pools in 2019 is the Bitcoin.com mining pool. Although this is one of the smaller pools available, the Bitcoin.com pool has some redeeming features that make it worth a look. It offers mining contracts, allowing you to test out Bitcoin mining before investing in mining equipment of your own. According to Bitcoin.com, they are the highest paying Pay Per Share (PPS) pool in the world, offering up to 98 percent block rewards as well as automatic switching between BTC and BCH mining to optimize profitability.

Electricity Costs
While your mining hardware is most important when it comes to how much BTC you can earn when mining, your electricity costs are usually the largest additional expense. With electricity costs often varying dramatically between countries, ensuring you are on the best cost-per-KWh plan available will help to keep costs down when mining.
Most commonly, large mining operations will be set up in countries where electricity costs are the lowest — such as Iceland, India, and Ukraine. Since China has one of the lowest energy costs in the world, it was previously the epicenter of Bitcoin mining. However, since the government began cracking down on cryptocurrencies, it has largely fallen out of favor with miners.
Technically, Venezuela is one of the cheapest countries in the world in terms of electricity, with the government heavily subsidizing these energy costs — while Bitcoin offers an escape from the hyperinflation suffered by the Venezuelan bolivar. Despite this, importing mining hardware into the country is a costly endeavor, making it impractical for many people.
Finding ways to lower your electricity costs is one of the best ways to improve your mining profitability. This can include investing in renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, or wind — which can yield increased profitability over the long term.
if you are looking to buy bitcoin mining equipment here is some links:

Model Antminer S17 Pro (56Th) from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 56Th/s for a power consumption of 2385W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s17-pro-56th-copy/?wpam_id=17
Model Antminer S9K from Bitmain mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 14Th/s for a power consumption of 1323W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/bitmain-antminer-s9k-14-th-s/?wpam_id=17
Model T2T 30Tfrom Innosilicon mining SHA-256 algorithm with a maximum hashrate of 30Th/s for a power consumption of 2200W.
https://miningwholesale.eu/product/innosilicon-t2t-30t/?wpam_id=17
mining wholesale website:
https://miningwholesale.eu/?wpam_id=17
submitted by mohamadk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

New r/HashHelp Subreddit Giveaway May 2019 - Free Block Assignments for Block Rewards

For those coming from eFreebies & Giveaways, this subreddit is dedicated to introducing people to Proof-of-Work cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin. In an effort to facilitate this, we're organizing a giveaway wherein we'll assign you a certain number of blocks and if the pool we're mining, either solo or shared, earns the block reward for one of these blocks then you'll win!
For those who are new to the space, proof-of-work makes use of algorithms that "mine" these coins by doing mathematical equations that help secure the blockchain's functions like sending and receiving these coins. In exchange for offering their resources to do so a block reward is given to one or a pool of these computers.
To get involved just:
  1. Join the HashHelp subreddit for regular giveaways
  2. Post in the comments whether you want to mine for Bitcoin Cash (BCHABC) or Pirl (PIRL).
In the response I'll follow-up with the details of what blocks you've been assigned, rig speed, and the expected payout if successful. The rigs are running as we speak, ready to mine that crypto! Good luck!
submitted by EnglishEditor to HashHelp [link] [comments]

Wealth Formula Episode 188: Ask Buck Part 2 (Transcript part 2)

So all right next question and we're already going pretty late this is a long question, okay this is a very long question or at least my answer is going to be very long because this is from Eric. He says this is a hypothetical question if you could participate actively and/or passively and only three of the following alternative investment types over the next five to seven years which ones and why. Okay so there's a long, there's a laundry list of different things here which I think it's useful to go over. These are all things I think the reason Eric has them is because they have been the subject of podcasts of mine over a period of time. Let me give you my personal opinion on each, it's not again not investor advice right this is not it advice, this is my opinion but I'm gonna go through each one that's on this laundry list and just give you a short little feedback from my opinion okay and then I'll come back and I'll give you my three favorites. So self storage units okay I like self storage. I like self storage because it's resilient to the cycles, the recessionary cycles etc and the issue like anywhere else though is you got to find the right operator. You can also you know you could probably learn to do this. I have not necessarily you know learned to do this but I think it's a good business, you know especially with the demographic changes, the boomers as they retire and they leave their you know big houses and they move somewhere warm like Florida or something like that then they got to put their stuff places and that makes it great or you can raise rents very quickly in these things. You basically nickel dime people up you know significantly every year the challenge is finding where do you invest and so I'll tell you that you know I'm not a big fan of funds. I know there are some funds out there I'm not a big fan of them because I like to know what's in the portfolio and I know for a fact that some of the funds are basically you know just a bunch of properties that no one wanted to take down an individual asset necessarily and so they all kind of got grouped together. I like self storage but the deal has to be just right. It has to be just the right location etc etc okay and by the way I think again and from an inflationary standpoint it's a great, great place to be too but you gotta find the right deal. I'm sure we'll get hopefully we'll get one this year in Investor Club. Mobile home parks. Mobile home parks now this should be a good place for hedging the economy because of low-income housing right because of the low income housing play right there's always gonna be people who need it. The problem is okay let me back up there are people who own mobile home parks who are doing really well and if you want to get it in into that I mean hey more power to you I mean there's people who are doing well and and they're making decent money but always just look it as a pure cash flow play okay and if you buy it on your own you may get who knows fifteen twenty percent cash on cash and you know you get a you're gonna know how to run these things. I don't know very much about it. I hear it's not necessarily that hard but you know I mean obviously the professional operators are probably gonna do more with it but you can still make their basically cash counts right now. Here's the problem with investing in them as a limited partner though is that most of funds I see they might be giving you nine ten percent and for me for that kind of low-income housing, I mean this is really like you know Class D stuff right, I mean this is below apartment buildings so nine ten percent is just not enough right and the reason why that you're only getting you know eight nine ten percent is because well I mean the operators are taking the other half usually. If you can learn to buy these on your own then it might be worth it but the reality is that in a fund model or a syndicated model there isn't gonna be a lot of upside there, right? I mean think about it. What do we do in the apartment space? We have the ability to raise rents quite a bit and improve these properties. You can even take a property that has you know currently has residents who are you know C plus residents and all of a sudden you know you've got some hipsters in there and also you've opened up a new completely different kind of asset right? You can do that with apartments but in mobile home parks you really can't do that, you can't do that. I mean seriously like how much can you raise the rent on a mobile home park, you know people are living in mobile home parks if they move up too much then they don't live in mobile home parks anymore so the bottom line is the appreciation on there is gonna be limited. The upside is gonna be limited and that means the annualized return will be limited okay because you're not gonna be able to rely very much on appreciation. It's going to be your cash on cash and think of it that's all. So I'm not a big fan. I'm just not a big fan because if you think about it the next thing on the list here, large multifamily 50-plus units. Well for me this is my number one asset class. I mean people gotta live somewhere and unlike mobile home parks you can get significant IRRs annualized returns by value-add through inflation and gentrification all these things that you really are limited in mobile home parks, you know you can't count on all that with mobile home parks and the reality is for investors if you look in you know Investor Club, our yields are just just as good as but the better than what you're seeing in the funds for mobile home parks and they're much higher quality assets in the right hands. In my opinion is even as a limited partner this continues to be the best place for not only capital preservation and growth capital preservation but also growth in the next five ten years. Okay so small multifamily in other words see you don't want to be a limited partner okay, you want to buy ten, 20 units etc. Well I used to do that more. I don't really do that anymore and I did really well right I mean I did really well with that kind of strategy. If you're a good operator then great go for it. The problem is that okay so say you're buying like a you know a million dollar asset you're gonna put in two hundred, two hundred fifty thousand dollars in that one asset to just buy it. The problem is that the risk profile is significant there if you don't know what you're doing right now as opposed to you know spreading your two hundred, two hundred fifty thousand over four deals in a syndicated deal and getting exposure to you know ten times more doors all of a sudden you've got two million dollars you know you've got two hundred two hundred fifty thousand dollars of equity sitting in one deal and his buck stops with you so if you are comfortable with that by all means I was comfortable with it I didn't necessarily like it and so what I would what I would say is if you're the type of person who really wants to get into the real estate game and be a landlord then go for it otherwise don't. Understand that it's very different to have a ten, twenty unit apartment building than it is a two hundred unit apartment building. One you're a landlord, the other one you're managing a small business so just be aware of that. Single-family homes is the next one on the list and I'll just tell you I just don't like them enough for our, not for our demographic, meaning like accredited investors, because you know you have the ability to do something a lot more scalable right, just through syndications and getting lots and lots of exposures. The thing I don't like about single family homes here's the deal, there's not enough scalability, there's too much Capex, okay so one roof and one furnace each unit and everyone I know who owns five or six single-family homes wishes they didn't own five or six in a single family homes they want to sell them. These get to ten and they're like this is terrible and you know I get a hundred dollars per property and then the next thing you know one month I get a five thousand dollar furnace to replace, so I'm not a big fan. So with multifamily if you're gonna do it on your own I would recommend that an award the way I think that most people who are probably not natural-born landlords should do is its consider syndications. When you get more scale and exposure to more doors, things become more stable, cash flow becomes more stable,there's less risk and in reality what we're seeing in our you know in our limited partnership opportunities is that the returns are you know better than probably most people can do on their own. The next one on the list is agriculture. Agriculture followed by CBD, specialty coffee, chocolate, well so let's start with you know some of these things because I know they've been on my podcast before, and just understand that when I have something on a podcast it does not mean I am advocating for it or saying that you should invest in it or that I even like the deal. All right so let's start with some generalities. Agriculture is fine. The stuff that I see some of the stuff that I'm seeing out there in the podcast ecosystem that you're mentioning concerns me okay and one of them is that I don't like foreign investments very much. I've had some experience with them I've realized the implications of those and I won't do them again, certainly with a smaller operator and the reason for that is that if things go wrong there you have very little recourse okay, yeah very little recourse and it's very difficult you know you have to know your operator very well. You have to trust them because if something happens overseas good luck trying to you know get any sort of retribution, ain't gonna happen right so be very careful with that, I know people get excited about it you know they go on some sort of you know they go on some sort of like investment trip and they come back and you know they're excited, they heard about something like this and it's shiny and bright and stuff like that well why what's the point, I just you know the best place to invest is right here in the US okay. The other thing is agriculture in general I would say it's fine, it's gonna be low yield and also I will say that when there's some thing like it doesn't grow three years and won't yield any cash flow for that period of time what seriously you're okay with that? Okay I'm not. And then on top of that when you sign the contract on these things look at the fine print. Look at what your exit is because you should never invest in anything unless you've thoroughly thought about how you're going to get out of it and some of these things have that problem as well. I'm not a big fan personally. Okay now CBD and I've seen that come up in the ecosystems a lot lately I again I CBD again that space is full of charlatans I would just be careful you know I see stuff people like yeah we're gonna go do this in California right well listen I live in California okay and let me tell you right now everybody I know around here knows this to be true. There is a glut of pot in California you know and apart from a selective highly skilled business people who are in the space, everyone else is gonna get killed, they just are there's this is like you know the horse has already left on this one right. People think I'm gonna do CBD in California guess what there's a few people have thought about this before you and if you're coming into this space and you have no previous experience in you know pot in CBD and all this stuff you're gonna be you're way behind. Okay and the last thing is that unless you are a major player like you got serious pockets behind you I would stay away from this because there is there is like so many laws and so many things to dodge in the space. All I can tell you is I have yet to see you know personally you know from anything that I've been you know sent that's in the US in California anything like that I would be comfortable investing in. Okay now I know there's you know startups and things like that and if you want to spend a little bit of money and those from you know people who know what they're talking about I get it but I would definitely look at that as a fairly high risk thing but for heaven's sake you know just don't listen to a Podcast or you know get an email about hey we're gonna start growing pot in California you want in just please think okay. Let's see the next one I'm going to skip oil and gas because I think I have a question coming up about oil and gas here in a moment. Cryptocurrency again listen it's an asymmetric risk type thing shouldn't be your bread and butter thing at all I mean 5-10 percent max in this bucket of asymmetric risk things that could go I mean the reason I do it is a listen, Bitcoin goes up by you know 10x which I honestly personally think it will you know in the five to 10-year horizon I want to be able to to enjoy that. Now it's not something that I would spend a lot more than that on. Personally I only put money in there that you know keeps me from you know it's the money that I would just spend on things that will you know like a fancy car something like that's what I do. Life settlements okay life settlements just as a reminder what are they? Life settlements are when you buy somebody else's life insurance policies, so maybe somebody's you know 80 years old in real bad health they would like money now they don't have any you know they're not worried about their kids don't need any money anymore so you can buy these policies from them. A lot of times that you know 50 60 cents on the dollar which is a much better deal for them than not getting any money or just you know trying to pull out cash value, it's generally going to be more than the cash value so it's an interesting play. We've talked about this before. We actually have a webinar on it at hedgetheeconomy.com if you're interested. So you're investing life settlements, you know you're basically looking and saying I'm a little worried about the economy and maybe I have a self-directed IRA or solo 401k because you know honestly the other thing is that this is not a tax sheltered type investment so you have to think about that as well, you think to yourself I want to hedge I want a small part of my portfolio something that I feel very comfortable is gonna be there. Well out of all the things that are guarantees in life, death is probably the only one that, people used to say death and taxes but you know I mean the president United States paying taxes has no guarantee in life right I mean death is the only guarantee in life so that it might be worth it, check it out for yourself, hedgetheeconomy.com. Now, notes. Notes it's sort of broad. Notes basically being liens on property for the most part, a lot of times that's what it's indicating. It really depends on the operator you know, I would you know look at it as you know if you look at AHP Servicing you know with Jorge’s company I have looked at this in terms of short-term kind of places to put money for liquidity that I can pull out you know if there's a liquid fund like AHP Servicing for example, but I like appreciation and so that's the problem right, so you might get nine, ten percent cash on cash in notes, you might do a little bit better but you know you're not getting any tax advantages. So with multifamily real estate I mean I can still get nine, ten percent cash on cash and then I get twenty percent plus I are ours typically and you know the nine, ten percent I got is tax deductible so it's really the tax equivalent of making like fifteen percent. So you know fortunately if it's me I do equity over any kind of real estate debt and mostly it's because of the tax advantages. Now if you are gonna do it again, look at your qualified money like IRAs, 401ks etc and you know look at a fund. I also think this is one of those things where you really have to look at the operator. I do like Jorge. He's one of the smartest guys I know so AHP Servicing certainly would be something to consider and I so like liquidity the component of this is a nice place to keep it for a period time. And understand it's not without risk either. This is non-performing paper, but again that's where the operator comes in and you know I think Jorge is a really smart guy so I feel fairly comfortable with that. Gold and silver well honestly I don't see the point as I've said earlier, I mean gold and silver are hedge to inflation so this real estate cash flows and frankly I don't believe in the zombie apocalypse narrative that I have heard before you know where you buy that monster box of silver coins which by the way I did because I drank the kool-aid a few years ago and you know there's this idea that you know you're the only thing that's gonna be able to buy anything is a monster box of silver that's the only thing that people are gonna accept. Well I just don't think that's gonna happen so for me why not buy real estate at least you know you know you can force appreciation etc. Now if you're super paranoid on real estate just you know limit your leverage I'm not saying don't own gold a silver I'm just saying think about it before you go and drink the kool-aid on the you know the fear-based stuff there music royalties and we did have a podcast on that honestly I just don't know much about it but you know some people seem to be doing okay with it I wouldn't make this a core holding unless you were in the business and really know what you're doing. I would put this in your high risk profile. Artwork, similar. Listen I like our work is like gold in my view and if you are an art buff and you really know what you're doing then go for it but I'm not. Some people like vintage cars like me to enjoy it and allow it to appreciate. I think art is similar to that right, so it goes into that pile that I've talked about before where it's like if you have an inch you know if you're one of those people who buys stuff you know nice stuff and you know you want nice stuff well art not fine art and vintage cars are fun but they will appreciate so I think art is similar to that. I know we podcast on fractional ownership apart you don't get the same effect because you know get to keep it in your house but you know you do get to they do keep it in a gallery so that's kind of neat however you know what I'm not a big enough art guy to do this so I'm gonna stick to bread-and-butter stuff instead like real estate, websites, online businesses, if you know what you're doing this can be very profitable. The problem is that most people don't know what they're doing and I have looked into these things a little bit on behalf of people and I've been a little suspicious at least if some of the sites they seem like Ponzi schemes to me but I don't know for sure. Okay but if you know what you're doing with this this is a great space I mean you can make a lot you can make a decent money with this. I've done that private lending well private lending you know as opposed to notes I guess you're just lending to flippers and stuff I mean I would suggest that this is not a bad thing to do if you know how to do it. I know if there's some people who do it pretty fairly prolifically in our group here's what I would suggest though if you're worried about the economy or at all and lending the home flippers is probably one of the riskiest thing you can do but how can you mitigate that risk? Well you may just loan at you know fifty percent loan to value right and in that situation if they can't pay you back at least you've got a property that you can take over at 50 percent of the cost right now. I definitely would not be you know doing super high loan-to-value type notes or private loans and then you know obviously there's some stuff like Lending Club and stuff I have not really you know looked into much, but I think some people have where you can do some of that as well but okay so that's the big list of my favorites. Large scale real estate like apartments and self storage and one that you didn't mention on here that we talked about earlier, Wealth Formula Banking. For me that stocks and bonds that's equity and basically a bond a structure for me right and that makes up 90% of my investments right there and then the rest of its you know shiny stuff, asymmetric risk stuff like Bitcoin gives me exposure to something that could explode and make me a lot of money potentially with a small investment, but if I lose it and won't go crying so you know bottom line is that I mean the the moral of this story is keep it simple. I think one of the things that I noticed that a lot of people are doing because of the podcast ecosystem and I'm somewhat to blame for this because they think you know we do put on different types of things but we've really narrowed that down a lot is that my advice would be that what I have noticed in my own investing success track record over the last 10 years is the stuff that makes money tends to be pretty boring right like real estate I mean at least I've done so many things in the last 10 years and you know the thing that keeps paying me is the stuff that's the most boring. So don't go look out look for shiny objects okay don't look for foreign investments don't look for you know crazy stuff when it comes to your bread-and-butter stuff keep it boring right I mean seriously you know you've got a if you're a limited partner you find a with an operator that keeps delivering why are you looking like for 10 different things. Okay I understand there's a need for some diversity but okay maybe two or three different things and maybe similar types of you know you find good operators you stick with them but you don't need like ten of those I mean it's silly right, just pick a few things and if there's some you know stuff like Bitcoin or something like that really interests you and that's kind of fun for you then you want to buy some you know vintage cars or something like that do that, but stay boring. There's an eloquence about boring that I have experienced in the last decade that I can just say from my experience over time it's not as boring when you get those nice payouts. So anyway we still have a bunch of questions and I've been going for almost an hour so I'm going cut it off and there will be therefore a part 3 Ask Buck. But I do want to thank you and for for having all these questions and we will have part three of Ask Buck next time. Thanks for joining Wealth Formula Podcast. This is Buck Joffrey signing off.
submitted by Buck_Joffrey to u/Buck_Joffrey [link] [comments]

For the first time since ASICs appeared, the 7-day average difficulty growth is negative

For the first time since ASICs appeared, the 7-day average difficulty growth is negative submitted by GrixM to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Hashlet Solo vs Regular?

I'm actually pretty surprised no one's posted about this, but GAW Miners released a new flavor of Hashlet yesterday, the Hashlet Solo. They also raised the price of the regular Hashlet, renamed it to Hashlet Prime and gave it more features. I had a single 1mh/s Hashlet at the time of this happening. GAW also promised a free Solo for existing Hashlet owners (supposed to come tonight, haven't gotten mine yet though).
My question is, for those of you that have bought a Solo, how does it stack up to the regular Hashlet/Prime? Does it pay out less? Approximately how much DOGE would you be able to buy with the BTC it generates? Also, please specify the variation of Solo (Zen, Clever, etc).
Thanks shibes!
submitted by Sn0wCh1ld to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The Great NiceHash Profit Explanation - for Sellers (the guys with the GPUs & CPUs)

Let's make a couple of things crystal clear about what you are not doing here:
But hey, I'm running MINING software!
What the hell am I doing then?!?
Who makes Profit, and how?
How is it possible everyone is making a profit?
Why do profits skyrocket, and will it last (and will this happen again)?
But my profits are decreasing all the time >:[
But why?!? I’m supposed to make lotsa money out of this!!!
But WHY!!!
  1. Interest hype -> Influx of Fiat money -> Coins quotes skyrocket -> Influx of miners -> Difficulty skyrockets -> Most of the price uptrend is choked within weeks, since it’s now harder to mine new blocks.
  2. Interest hype drains out -> Fiat money influx declines -> Coins quotes halt or even fall -> Miners still hold on to their dream -> Difficulty stays up high, even rises -> Earnings decrease, maybe even sharply, as it's still harder to mine new blocks, that may be even paid less.
So, how to judge what’s going on with my profits?
Simple breakdown of the relationship of BTC payouts by NiceHash, BTC/ALT Coins rates, and Fiat value:
BTC quote | ALTs quotes | BTC payout | Fiat value ----------------------------------------------------- UP | UP | stable*) | UP stable | UP | UP | UP UP | stable | DOWN | stable*) stable | stable | stable | stable DOWN | stable | UP | stable*) stable | DOWN | DOWN | DOWN DOWN | DOWN | stable*) | DOWN 
Some rather obvious remarks:
More help:
Disclaimer: I'm a user - Seller like you - not in any way associated with NiceHash; this is my personal view & conclusion about some more or less obvious basics in Crypto mining and particularly using NiceHash.
Comments & critics welcome...
submitted by t_3 to NiceHash [link] [comments]

A tour of the Gridcoin wallet

Hey guys, I thought I would put together an in-depth tour of the Gridcoin wallet software for all of our recent newcomers. Here I'll be outlining all the features and functions the windows GUI wallet has to offer, along with some basic RPC command usage. I'll be using the windows wallet as an example, but both linux and macOS should be rather similar. I'll be including as many pictures as I can as embedded hyperlinks.
Edit: Note that since I originally made this there has been a UI update, so your client will be different colors but all the button locations are in the same place.
This is my first post like this, so please forgive me if this appears a little scatter-brained.
This will not cover the mining setup process for pool or solo miners.
When you launch the wallet software for the first time you should be greeted with this screen.

OVERVIEW TAB

After that prompt, you should be left sitting on the main overview tab with several fields on it.
From top to bottom:

SEND TAB

Now onto the other tabs on the left side. Currently we're on the Overview tab, lets move down to the Send tab. This tab it pretty self-explanatory, you use it if you want to send coins, but I'll go over the fields here:
  • Pay To: Enter a valid gridcoin address to send coins too. Gridcoin addresses always start with an S or and R.
  • Label: Enter a label here and it will put that address in your "address book" under that label for later use. You can leave it blank if you don't want it in your address book.
  • Message: Enter a message here if you want it attached to your transaction.
  • Amount: How many coins you want to send.
  • Add Attachment: Leave this alone, it is broken.
  • Track Coins: This doesn't do anything.

RECEIVE TAB

Now down to the Receive tab. Here you should have a single address listed. If you double click on the label field, you can edit it's label.
  • New: Generate a new address.
If you click on an address, the rest of the options should be clickable.
  • Copy: Copy the selected address to your clipboard.
  • Show QR Code: Show a scan-able QR code for the selected address.
  • Sign Message: Cryptographically sign a message using the selected address.

TRANSACTIONS TAB

The Transactions tab is pretty boring considering we have no transactions yet. But as you can see there are some sorting tools at the top for when you do have transactions listed.

ADDRESS BOOK TAB

The Address Book is where all the addresses you've labeled (that aren't yours) will show up.
  • Verify Message: Verifies a message was signed by the selected address.
The rest of the functions are similar to the functions on the Receive tab.

VOTING TAB

Onto the Voting tab. There wont be any polls because we aren't in sync yet.
  • Reload Polls: Pretty self-explanatory, I've never had to use this.
  • Load History: By default, the wallet will only display active polls. If you want to view past polls you can use this.
  • Create Poll: You can create a network-wide poll. You must have 100,000 coins as a requirement to make a poll. (Creating a poll does not consume the coins)
Here's what the Voting tab will look like once you're in sync

CONTEXT BAR

Now onto the context bar menus on the top.
Under File you have:
  • Backup Wallet/Config: This lets you backup your wallet configuration file just in case.
  • Export: You can export your Transactions tab or Address Book in CSV format.
  • Sign message: Does the same thing as on the Receive tab.
  • Verify message: Does the same thing as on the Address Book tab.
  • Exit: Close the wallet.
Under Settings you have:
  • Encrypt Wallet: Encrypts your wallet with a password. (we'll come back to this)
  • Change Passphrase: Allows you to change your encryption password.
  • Options: Opens the options menu. (We'll come back to this)
Under Community you have:
Under Advanced you have:
  • Advanced Configuration: Opens the Advanced Configuration menu. (Not so advanced if you ask me)
  • Neural Network: Allows you to view solo miners project statistics. It will be largely blank if you're not in sync yet.
  • FAQ: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Foundation: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Rebuild Block Chain: Starts the client syncing from 0. Don't worry, using this will not make you lose coins.
  • Download Blocks: Downloads the latest official snapshot, can help speed up syncing. The download progress tends to sit at 99.99% for a long time, don't worry, it's working.
Under Help you have:
  • Debug window: Opens the debug window. (We'll come back to this)
  • Diagnostics: Don't touch this, it is broken. This has since been fixed. You can use this to see if there is anything wrong with your setup.
  • About Gridcoin: Opens the About Dialog. This gives you your client version and other information.

OPTIONS

Now back to the options menu under Settings > Options.
Here we have the options menu main tab:
  • Pay transaction fee: The transaction fee that will be automatically paid when you make a transaction.
  • Reserve: You can reserve an amount so that it will always be available for spending.
  • Start Gridcoin on system login: Pretty self-explanatory
  • Detach databases at shutdown: Speeds up shutdown, but causes your blockchain file to no longer be portable.
On the Network tab:
  • Map port using UPnP: Attempts to connect to nodes through UPnP.
  • Connect through SOCKS proxy: Allows you to connect through a proxy.
The window tab is pretty self-explanatory.
The Display tab is also pretty self-explanatory, with the exception of:
  • Display coin control features (experts only!): This allows you to have a great deal of control over the coins in your wallet, check this for now and I'll explain how to use it further down. Don't forget to click "Apply".

ENCRYPTING YOUR WALLET

Now that all of that is out of the way. The first thing you'll want to do is encrypt your wallet. This prevents anybody with access to your computer from sending coins. This is something I would recommend everyone do.
Go to Settings > Encrypt Wallet and create a password. YOU CANNOT RECOVER YOUR COINS IF YOU FORGET YOUR PASSWORD.
Your wallet will close and you will have to start it up again. This time when it opens up, you should have a new button in the bottom left. Now if you want to stake you will have to unlock your wallet. Notice the "For staking only" box that is checked by default. If you want to send a beacon for solo mining or vote, you will need to uncheck this box.

GETTING IN SYNC AND ICONS

Before we continue, Let's wait until we're in sync. Depending on your internet speeds, this could take from several hours to over a day or 2. This can be sped up by using Advanced > Download Blocks, but this can still take several hours.
This is what an in-sync client should look like. Notice the green check to the right of the Receive tab. All of these icons give you information when you hover your mouse over them.
The lock
The arrow tells you if you're staking. If you aren't staking, it will tell you why you're not staking. If you are staking it will give you an estimated staking time. Staking is a very random process and this is only an estimate, not a countdown.
The connection bars tell you how many connections to the network you have.
The check tells you if you're in sync.

WHAT IS STAKING?

Now I've said "stake" about a million times so far and haven't explained it. Gridcoin is a Proof of Stake (PoS) coin.
Unlike bitcoins Proof of Work (PoW), PoS uses little system resources, so you can use those resources for scientific work. PoS works by users "Staking" with their balance. The higher the balance, the higher the chance to create, or "stake" a block. This means you need to have a positive balance in order to stake. Theoretically, you can stake with any amount over 0.0125 coins, but in practice it's recommended to have at least 2000 coins to reliably stake.
Staking is important for solo miners, because they get paid when they stake. Pool miners don't need to stake in order to get paid however. So if you want to solo mine, you'll need to buy some coins from an exchange or start in the pool first and move to solo when you have enough coins.
In addition to Research Rewards for miners, anyone who holds coins (solo miners, pool miners, and investors) gets 1.5% interest annually on top of your coins. So it can be beneficial for pool miners to stake as well.
Here is a snippet of what a research rewards transaction looks like from my personal wallet. I have a label on that address of "Payout address" as you can see here.

UTXOS AND COIN CONTROL

At this point you'll need some coins. You can use one of our faucets like this one or this one to test coin control out.
First let me explain what a UTXO is. UTXO stands for Unspent Transaction Output. Say you have an address with 0 coins in it, and someone sends you 10 coins like I've done here. Those 10 coins are added to that address in the form of a UTXO, so we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO in it.
Now we receive another 5 coins at the same address, like so. Now we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO and one 5 coin UTXO. But how do we view how our addresses are split up into different UTXOs?
Earlier we checked the "Display coin control features" box in Settings > Options > Display. Once that's checked you'll notice there's another section in the Send tab labeled "Coin Control Features". If you click the "Inputs" button, you'll get a new window. And look, there's our 2 UTXOs.
All UTXOs try to stake separately from each other, and remember that the chance a UTXO has to stake is proportional to it's size. So in this situation, my 10 coin UTXO has twice the chance to stake as my 5 coin UTXO. Now wallets, especially ones that make a lot of transactions, can get very fragmented over time. I've fragmented my wallet a little so I can show you what I'm talking about.
How do we clean this up? We can consolidate all this into one UTXO by checking all the boxes on the left and selecting OK.
Now pay attention to the fields on the top:
  • Quantity: The total amount of UTXOs we have selected.
  • Amount: The total amount of coins we have selected.
  • Fee: How much it would cost in fees to send all those UTXOs (more UTXOs = more transaction data = more fees)
  • After Fee: Amount - Fees.
  • Bytes: How large the transaction is in bytes.
  • Priority: How your client would prioritize making a transaction with this specific set of UTXOs selected had you not used coin control.
  • Low Output: If your transaction is less than 0.01 coins (I think).
  • Change: What you will get back in change.
  • custom change address: You can set the address you get your change back at, by default it will generate a new address.
So let's fill out our transaction so we end up with 1 UTXO at the end.
In "Pay To:" Just put any address in your wallet, and for the amount put what it has listed in the "After Fee" Field. Just like this.
Notice how we get no change back.
Now click "Send", we'll be prompted to enter our passphrase and we're asked if we want to pay the fee, go ahead and click "Yes".
Now if we go back to the Overview tab we get this funky icon. If you hover your mouse over it, it says "Payment to yourself", and the -0.0002 GRC is the network transaction fee.
(Ignore the first one, that was me fragmenting my wallet)
Now if we look at the Coin Control menu, we can see that we've slimmed our wallet down from 7 UTXOs to 1.
Now why would you want to use coin control?
2 Situations:
  1. UTXOs less than 0.0125 coins cannot stake. So you can combine a lot of tiny, useless UTXOs into 1 bigger one that can stake.
  2. After a UTXO stakes, it cannot stake for another 16 hours. So if you have 1 large UTXO that is big enough to stake more than once every 16 hours, you can split it into smaller UTXOs which can allow you to stake slightly more often.
  3. By default, the wallet will always generate a new address for change, which can make your wallet get very messy if you're sending lots of transactions. Keep in mind that more UTXOs = larger transactions = more fees.
Sidenote - When you stake, you will earn all research rewards owed reguardless of which UTXO staked. However, you'll earn the 1.5% interest for that UTXO. Not your whole wallet.

FORKING

A fork is when the network splits into multiple chains, with part of the network on each chain. A fork can happen when 2 blocks are staked by different clients at the same time or very close to the same time, or when your client rejects a block that should have been accepted due to a bug in the code or through some other unique circumstance.
How do I know if I'm on a fork?
Generally you can spot a fork by looking at the difficulty on your Overview tab. With current network conditions, if your difficulty is below 0.1, then you're probably on a fork.
You can confirm this by comparing your blockhash with someone elses, like a block explorer.
Go to [Help > Debug Window > Console]. This is the RPC console, we can use to do a lot of things. You can type help to get a list of commands, and you can type help [command you need help with] (without the brackets) to get information on a command. We'll be using the getblockhash [block number] command.
Type getblockhash [block number] in the console, but replace [block number] with the number listed next to the "Blocks:" field on the Overview tab.
This will spit out a crazy string of characters, this is the "blockhash" of that block.
Now head over to your favorite block explorer, I'll be using gridcoinstats. Find the block that you have the hash for, use the search bar or just find it in the list of blocks.
Now compare your hash with the one gridcoinstats gives you. Does it match?
If it matches, then you're probably good to go. If it matches but you still think you're on a fork, then you can try other block explorers, such as gridcoin.network or neuralminer.io.
If it doesn't match, then you need to try to get off that fork.
How do I get off a fork?
  1. Just wait for an hour or two. 95% of the time your client is able to recover itself from a fork given a little time.
  2. Restart the client, wait a few minutes to see if it fixes itself. If it doesn't restart again and wait. Repeat about 4 or 5 times.
  3. Find where the fork started. Using the getblockhash command, go back some blocks and compare hashes with that on a block explorer so you can narrow down what the last block you and the block explorer had in common. Then use reorganize [the last block hash you had in common]. Note that reorganize takes a blockhash, not a block number.
  4. Use Advanced > Download Blocks.
  5. If none of this works, you can take a look at social media (reddit/steemit) and see what other people are saying.

CONFIGURATION FILE

Your configuration file depends on your operation system:
  • On Windows: %appdata%\GridcoinResearch\
  • On Linux: ~/.GridcoinResearch/
  • On MacOS: /Users/USERNAME/Library/Application/Support/GridcoinResearch/
And it should look like this.
If you open up your gridcoinresearch.conf, you'll see the default one it generated. Note that if you entered your email earlier, the first line will have your email on it instead of "investor". If you decided you want to solo mine but didn't enter your email when you first started the wallet, go ahead and put your email on the first line in place of "investor". If you're a pool miner, just leave it as "investor".
Next, it's recommended that you use the addnodes on the gridcoin wiki. So our gridcoinresearch.conf will look like this.
A useful line for solo miners is PrimaryCPID=[YOUR CPID]. Sometimes your wallet can pick up on the wrong CPID so it's good to have that in there if you're solo mining.

RUNNING A LISTENING NODE

A listening node is a node that listens for blocks and transactions broadcasted from nodes and forwards them on to other nodes. For example, during the syncing process when you're getting your node running for the first time, you're downloading all the blocks from listening nodes. So running a listening node helps support the network.
Running a gridcoin listening node is simple. All you need to do is add listen=1 to your gridcoinresearch.conf and you need to forward port 32749 on your router.
If you don't know how to port forward, I'd suggest googling "How to port forward [your router manufacturer]".

QUICK LINKS

Gridcoin.us Official Website
Gridcoin.science Unofficial Website
Gridcoinstats.eu Block Explorer
NeuralMiner.io Block Explorer
Gridcoinstats.eu Faucet
Gridcoin.ch Faucet
Gridcoin Wiki
Gridcoin Github
GRCPool
Arikado Pool
And that's all I have for now!
I plan to keep this post up-to-date with changes in the client. So if anyone has any suggestions, have clarifications they want made, or maybe I got something wrong, then please feel free to leave a comment below or PM me!
submitted by Personthingman2 to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Best pool? Why? Go!

I am just wondering what pool is the best..I am currently mining at elgius and bitminter. I am not sure if I am getting proper payout from biminter..I have only been mining at bitminter for a day with 1 TH and I dont hav even .01 yet? With 180 GH at elgius I feel like I am getting more.
submitted by apollojmr to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Working of Cryptocurrency Mining pool

Working of Cryptocurrency Mining pool
Source - https://coinscapture.com/blog/working-of-cryptocurrency-mining-pool

Working of Cryptocurrency Mining pool
Cryptocurrency is the most discussed and trending topic on various internet forums, communities, and social media. Many individuals are keen to enter the cryptoworld and unfold all the profits within it. Cryptocurrency can be bought from an exchange or mined through the mining pools. In this guide, we’ll understand the working of the cryptocurrency mining pool.
What is Mining Pool?
Cryptocurrency mining is the same as mining the metals from the earth. The individual or company that digs out the metal from the earth becomes the owner similarly the individual who discovers first the valid hash using the computational power becomes the owner and earns a block reward. The crypto mining can either be done solo using his/her own mining devices or through a mining pool.
As more and more enthusiasts participated in mining to earn a block reward became equally difficult and it would take centuries for a miner to generate a block because the probability of finding the hash value first and generating a block is directly proportional to the computing power in the network. The smaller the computational power the smaller is the chance of generating the next block. Hence a solution, to this problem mining pools were formed.
A mining pool is a group of miners pooling/combining their computational power together in order to mine a cryptocurrency quickly and earn a block reward consistently. Each contributing miner earns reward according to their investment in processing power. The working of mining pools depends on certain algorithms that are designed to check the authenticity and validity of the transactions. Miners are required to solve a complex math problem that requires millions of calculations with the help of High computational power. When the miners combined their computational power the block generation process happens at a much faster rate as compared to a single mining rig. For more understanding of mining please refer our previous blog (What is Bitcoin mining?)
Types of Mining Pools
  • Single mining pools: This type of mining pool mine only single cryptocurrency
  • Multi-currency pools: This type of mining pool mine different cryptocurrencies and gives the miner a chance to choose the cryptocurrency for mining timely depending rewards points offered.
  • Cloud mining pools: Cloud-based mining can be combined with mining pools by making an online contract. This type of mining pool allows individuals to participate in mining activity without even buying specialized equipment.
How rewards are shared on mining pools?
The rewards shared after successfully adding the new block to the blockchain vary from currency to currency. The reward sharings also depend on the factors like mining difficulty, the exchange rate between different coins, the hash rate and the block generation time. Some of the followed reward structures are as follows:
  1. Pay-per-share (PPS): This method offers instant payout depending on the miner’s contribution to finding the block. The payment is done using the pool's existing balance and can be withdrawn immediately.
  2. Shared Maximum Pay Per Share (SMPPS): It is the same as Pay-per-share (PPS) but limits the payout to the maximum that the pool has earned.
  3. Equalized Shared Maximum Pay Per Share (ESMPPS): This method is similar to (SMPPS) but the rewards are distributed equally among all miners in the pool.
  4. Proportional (PROP): The miner is rewarded the share that is proportional to the number of shares he has in the pool with respect to the pool’s total shares
Advantages of mining pools
  • Mining pools offer a more stable income
  • Mining pools lower costs of mining
  • Mining pools helps in generating a higher income
Disadvantages of Mining pools
  • There may be some interruptions in the Mining pools
  • There is a sharing of block rewards
  • There may be sometimes unfavorable pool reward structure
Widely-Used Mining Pools
  • Antpool: The largest pool available on the web offering mining of cryptocurrencies like BTC, BCH, LTC, ETH, ETC, ZEC, DASH, SCC, XMC, BTM
  • Minergate.com: A public mining pool mining of cryptocurrencies like ETH, ETC, ZEC, BTG, BCN, XMR, XMO, FCN, XDN, AEON
  • Btc.com: The most popular mining pool among miners offering cryptocurrencies BTC, BCH, ETH, ETC, LTC, UBTC, DCR to mine
  • BTCC: The largest Chinese pool in the world mining 7% of all existing blocks.
  • Slush: The most trusted mining pools on internet mining 7% of all available blocks.
Mining pools can definitely be a change to the entire mining process offering the highest and the real income without spending years depending on the computational powers. Hence, investing in a mining pool can be beneficial but always choose the mining pool that fits your personal needs and facilities.
submitted by coinscapturecom to u/coinscapturecom [link] [comments]

I'm tired of waiting for asics, is there a cheap FPGA Miner I can buy?

Title says it all. I have some BFL stuff on hold, which will probably never really ship, and I'm going to try to get some avalon as well. But I want to set something up right now, to hold me over, preferably not something hugely expensive, just a cheap fpga to run while I wait.
submitted by bsdpunk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

There are 1.8 million mined coins, still unspent. (Fun facts about mined blocks)

Here are some fun mining facts.
Many early Bitcoin blocks had mining rewards paid, but never spent. They remain in the address assigned at mining, "unspent".
Block 9 had the first famous (Satoshi to Hal) spent coins, and then block 78 is the first to be all-spent (Hal's paper wallet), but most of the early blocks were unspent.
All the early blocks (before Block 79,764) were also mined to a single payout address -- something you don't see often any more.
Today, 36,293 addresses contain unspent coins from single-address mining, totaling 1,813,859 BTC.
Almost all of that (1,801,945 BTC) is in blocks mined for 50 BTC* (Before #210,000, 2012 Nov)
In comparison, only 11,590 BTC remains in addresses mined for 25 BTC (before #420,000)
Only 32 blocks mined 12.5 BTC to one address and left all of it untouched. (324 BTC total) Notably:
Encryption of the wallet private keys was not in the early versions of software, having only been added in July 2011. This means that all blocks earlier than #135,000 or so were probably mined to an unencrypted wallet. That's 35,426 addresses with 1,769,905 BTC, all unencrypted at the time of their origin, and never spent.
EDIT: This page from Antoine Le Calvez describes more destroyed Bitcoin: https://medium.com/@alcio/how-to-destroy-bitcoins-255bb6f2142e It's thought that Counterparty intentionally removed 2,130 BTC from circulation, along with 3.66 burned in OP_RETURN and 10.2 BTC to incorrect (reduced) miner rewards. Interesting!
submitted by MaxTG to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why I just sold 50% of my bitcoins: GHash.IO

tl;dr: GHash.IO shows that the economic incentives behind Bitcoin are probably very flawed, it might take a disaster to get the consensus to fix it, and if that happens I want to make sure I can pay my rent and buy food while we're fixing it.
I made a promise to myself a while back that I'd sell 50% of my bitcoins if a pool hit 50%, and it's happened. I've known for awhile now that the incentives Bitcoin is based on are flawed for many reasons and seeing a 50% pool even with only a few of those reasons mattering is worrying to say the least.
Where do we go from here? We need to do three things:
1) Eliminate pools.
2) Provide a way for miners to solo-mine with low varience and frequent mining payouts even with only small amounts of hashing power.
3) Get rid of ASICs.
Unfortunately #3 is probably impossible - there is no known way to make a PoW algorithm where an ASIC implementation isn't significantly less expensive on a marginal cost basis than an implementation on commodity hardware. Every way people have tried has the perverse effect of increasing the cost to make the first ASIC, which just further centralizes mining. Absent new ideas - ideas that will be from hardware engineers, not programmers - SHA256² is probably the best of many bad choices. (and no, PoS still stands for something other than 'stake')
We are however lucky that we have physics and (maybe) international relations on our side. It will always be cheaper to run a small amount of hashing power than a large amount, at least for some value of 'small' and 'large'. It's the cube-square law, as applied to heat dissipation: a small amount of mining equipment has a much larger surface area compared to a large amount, and requires much less effort per unit hashing power to keep cool. Additionally finding profitable things to do with small amounts of waste heat is easy and distributed all over the planet - heating houses, water tanks, greenhouses, etc. As for international relations, restricting access to chip fabrication facilities is a very touchy subject due to how it can make or break economies, and especially militaries. (but that's a hopeful view)
Solving problem #1 and getting rid of pools is probably possible - Andrew Miller came up with the idea of a non-outsourceable puzzle. While tricky to implement, the basic idea is simple: make it possible for whomever finds the block to steal the reward, even after the fact, in a way that doesn't make it possible to prove any specific miner did it. Adding this protection to Bitcoin requires a hard-fork as described, though perhaps there's a similar idea that can be done as a soft-fork. Block withholding attacks - where miners simply don't submit valid solutions - could also achieve the same goal, although in a far uglier way.
Solving problem #2 and letting miners achieve low varience even with a small amount of hashing power is also possible - p2pool does it already, and tree chains would do it as a side effect. However p2pool is itself just another type of pool, so if non-outsourceable puzzles are implemented they'll need to be compatible. p2pool in its current form is also less then ideal - it does need a lot of bandwidth, and if you have lower latency than average you have a significant unfair advantage. But these are problems that (probably) can be fixed before adding it to the protocol. (this can be done in a soft-fork)
Do I still think Bitcoin will succeed in the long run? Yes, but I'm a lot less sure of it than I used to be. I'm also very skeptical that any of the above will be implemented without a clear failure of the system happening first - there's just too many people, miners, developers, merchants, etc. whose heads are in the sand, or even for that matter, actively making the problem worse. If that failure happens it's quite likely that the Bitcoin price will drop to essentially nothing - not a good way to start a few months of work fixing the problem when my expenses are denominated in Canadian dollars. I hope I'm on the wrong side of history here, but I'm a cautious guy and selling a significant chunk of bitcoins is just playing it safe; I'm not rich.
BTW If you owe me fiat and normally pay me via Bitcoin, for the next 2.5 weeks you can pay me based on the price I sold at, $650 CAD.
submitted by petertodd to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

such beginner shibe thread wow how to get coin

 how to shibecoin v rich in minutes much instruct so simple any doge can do 

START HERE

UPDATE 1/21/14: I'm not updating this guide anymore. Most of the steps should still work though. See the wiki or check the sidebar for updated instructions.
Before you do anything else, you need to get a wallet. Until there's a secure online wallet, this means you need to download the dogecoin client.
Now open the client you just downloaded. You'll be given a default address automatically, and it should connect to peers and start downloading the dogechain (aka blockchain in formal speak). You'll know because there will be a progress bar at the bottom and at the lower right there should be a signal strength icon (TODO: add screenshots).
If you've waited 2 or 3 minutes and nothing is happening, copy this:
maxconnections=100 addnode=95.85.29.144 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=146.185.181.114 addnode=188.165.19.28 addnode=166.78.155.36 addnode=doge.scryptpools.com addnode=doge.netcodepool.org addnode=doge.pool.webxass.de addnode=doge.cryptopool.it addnode=pool.testserverino.de addnode=doge.luckyminers.com addnode=doge.cryptovalley.com addnode=miner.coinedup.comdoge addnode=doge.cryptoculture.net addnode=dogepool.pw addnode=doge.gentoomen.org addnode=doge.cryptominer.net addnode=67.205.20.10 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=78.46.57.132 
And paste it into a new text file called dogecoin.conf, which you then place into the dogecoin app directory.
Now restart your qt client and the blockchain should start downloading in about 1-2 minutes.
Once it finished downloading, you're ready to send and receive Dogecoins!

GETTING COINS

Decide how you want to get Dogecoin. Your options are:
I'll go into detail about each of these. I'm currently writing this out. I'll make edits as I add sections. Suggestions are welcome.

MINING

Mining is how new dogecoins are created. If you're new to crypto currencies, read this. To mine (also called "digging"), a computer with a decent GPU (graphics card) is recommended. You can also mine with your CPU, but it's not as efficient.

GPU MINING

These instructions cover only Windows for now. To mine, you'll need to figure out what GPU you have. It'll be either AMD/ATI or Nvidia. The setup for both is approximately the same.

Step One: Choose a pool

There's a list of pools on the wiki. For now it doesn't really matter which one you choose. You can easily switch later.
NOTE: You can mine in two ways. Solo mining is where you mine by yourself. When you find a block you get all the reward. Pool mining is when you team up with other miners to work on the same block together. This makes it more likely that you'll find a block, but you won't get all of it, you'll have to split it up with others according to your share of the work. Pool mining is recommended because it gives you frequent payouts, because you find more blocks. The larger the pool you join, the more frequent the payouts, but the smaller the reward you get.
Over a long period of time the difference between pool and solo mining goes away, but if you solo mine it might be months before you get any coins.

Step two: Set up pool account

The pool you chose should have a getting started page. Read it and follow the instructions. Instructions vary but the general idea is:
When you're done with this, you'll need to know:

Step three: Download mining software

For best performance you'll need the right mining software.
Unzip the download anywhere you want.

Step four: Set up miner

Create a text file in the same folder as your miner application. Inside, put the command you'll be running (remove brackets).
For AMD it's cgminer.exe --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://: -u -p
For Nvidia it's cudaminer.exe -o stratum+tcp://: -O :
Substitute the right stuff in for the placeholders. Then on the next line of the text file type pause. This will let you see any errors that you get. Then save the file with any name you want, as long as the file extension is .bat. For example mine_serverName.bat.

Step five: Launch your miner

Just open the .bat file and a command line window should pop up, letting you know that the miner is starting. Once it starts, it should print out your hash rate.
If you now go to the pool website, the dashboard should start showing your hashrate. At first it'll be lower than what it says in the miner, but that's because the dashboard is taking a 5 minute average. It'll catch up soon enough.
NOTE: A normal hashrate is between 50 Kh/s up to even 1 Mh/s depending on your GPU.

You're now mining Dogecoins

That's it, nothing more to it.

CPU MINING

CPU mining isn't really recommended, because you'll be spending a lot on more on power than you'd make from mining Dogecoin. You could better spend that money on buying Dogecoin by trading. But if you have free electricity and want to try it out, check out this informative forum post.

Trading

Trading has been difficult so far, but Dogecoin just got added to a few new exchanges. If you don't have a giant mining rig, this is probably the best way to get 100k or more dogecoins at the moment. I'll write up a more complete guide, but for now check out these sites:

Faucets

Faucets are sites that give out free coins. Usually a site will give out somewhere between 1 and 100 Dogecoin. Every site has its own time limits, but usually you can only receive coins once every few hours, or in some cases, days. It's a great way to get started. All you do is copy your address from the receive section of your wallet and enter it on some faucet sites. Check out /dogecoinfaucets for more. If you go to each site on there you might end up with a couple hundred Dogecoin!

Begging

This method is pretty straightforward. Post your receiving address, and ask for some coins. Such poor shibe. The only catch is, don't do it here! Please go to /dogecoinbeg.

Tips

At the moment there are two tip bots:
Other redditors can give you Dogecoin by summoning the tip bot, something like this:
+dogetipbot 5 doge
This might happen if you make a good post, or someone just wants to give out some coins. Once you receive a tip you have to accept it in a few days or else it'll get returned. Do this by following the instructions on the message you receive in your inbox. You reply to the bot with "+accept". Commands go in the message body. Once you do that, the bot will create a tipping address for you, and you can use the links in the message you receive to see your info, withdraw coins to your dogecoin-qt wallet, see your history, and a bunch of other stuff.
As a bonus, so_doge_tip has a feature where you can get some Dogecoins to start with in exchange for how much karma you have. To do this, send the message "+redeem DOGE" to so_doge_tip. You'll need to create a tipping account if you don't have one.
If you want to create a tipping account without ever being tipped first, message either of the bots with "+register" and an address will be created for you.

CHANGELOG

  • 1/21/14 - Added note about this thread no longer being updated
  • 1/21/14 - Changed wallet links to official site
  • 12/27/13 - Added 1.3 wallet-qt links
  • 12/21/13 - Added new windows 1.2 wallet link
  • 12/20/13 - Fixed +redeem text
  • 12/18/13 - Added short blurb on trading.
  • 12/18/13 - Updated cudaminer to new version (cudaminer-2013-12-18.zip).
  • 12/18/13 - Fixed +redeem link
  • 12/18/13 - Updates dogecoin.conf, from here.
  • 12/17/13 - Linked to mining explanation.
  • 12/17/13 - Added link to CPU mining tutorial, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added links to tip commands, link to dogetipbot wiki.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about tip commands going in body, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added link to cgminer mirror, thanks to scubasteve812 and thanks to Bagrisham.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about removing brackets in response to this.
  • 12/15/13 - Fixed hash rate as per this comment, thanks lleti
  • 12/15/13 - Added info for all other ways of getting money, except for trading (placeholder for now)
  • 12/15/13 - Added windows GPU mining instructions 12/15/13 - Added wallet instructions, list of how to get money
submitted by lego-banana to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Classic solo mining @ Luckypool.co

submitted by Whiteboyfntastic1 to Bitcoin_Classic [link] [comments]

Let's take a step back here

I'm going to preface with this. I don't claim to be a crypto guru. Im still relatively new to crypto compared to some. I don't want this to be taken as a "I know all and you guys know nothing." This is simply a look at the bigger picture and some advice that I've followed and it hasn't let me down.
With the raise of the minimum payout, especially after people (understandably)having their jimmies rustled after the hack, there has been an onslaught of posts that have made it very obvious that many are here on the bandwagon and have jumped in without understanding how crypto, and nicehash, works. We need to take a step back and think about what's going on.
I'm going to start with some advice. And this is advice I've given every single person who has asked me about getting into crypto. You need to RESEARCH what you're investing in. Blindly investing into anything is just asking for trouble.
Now to give some insight on how this relates to the increase in payment threshold. This all boils down to fees. And fees are dependent on transaction congestion. Right now, fees are ridiculous. When nicehash went down, I was mining zcash and vertcoin direct. I had accumulated about $40 worth of coin total, between both currencies. When I tried to cash out, the smallest fee I could pay was ~$20. That's half my earnings. I said HECK NO (and ended up transferring for litecoin and transferring to my main trading stack in gdax. The fee was considerably less).
Now, with the way nicehash functions, their goal is for the user to pay as little fees as possible. They do this by essentially grouping transactions. Think about it this way. That ~$40 worth of bitcoin was going to cost me ~$20. Well if I had ~$80 worth of bitcoin, that fee would be ~$20 still. This is how nicehash gets away with a flat fee. By grouping more bitcoin into one transaction, they can effectively split the fee into a flat rate. Are there some cons? Sure. Smaller miners are paying a higher percentage in fees in comparison to their earnings than larger miners have to pay. But this is still the lesser of two evils. I'd rather pay the smaller fee of the grouped transaction than pay the fee for my transaction by itself.
So, what does raising the minimum withdrawal threshold do? Sure, some users will have to wait longer. And yeah, it forces users to keep their btc under someone else's control. But the goal is to make the transactions MORE EFFICIENT. By grouping more btc into each transaction and dividing the fee amongst the miners, it not only saves you from having to pay the ridiculous fee of having a solo transaction processes (a big yay for small miners) but it also keeps it to where they don't have to raise their flat fees (also a yay for smaller miners). The only downside is that it forces users to keep their btc on a less than ideal wallet format.
NOTE: to further cover this topic I am going to edit in a link that goes further into depth than I'm going. I just wanted to put it into more simplified terms for readings sake.
Tl;Dr for those who don't like walls of text...RESEARCH. Gain an understanding on how fees work and how nicehash is making it more efficient for the end user.
submitted by rathpwner to NiceHash [link] [comments]

ELI5: why is p2pool better than any other mining pool (GHash, BTC Guild, Eligius, etc.)

submitted by starwarsgeek to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

For a bit of fun I've created 2 anonymous solo mining pools for anyone who wants to try the bitcoin lottery without having to download the blockchain.

If you have any mining devices (ie not CPU's or GPU's) then you are welcome to point them to my experimental solo mining pools. I have one for BTC and one for BCH and am considering a 3rd that tracks the most profitable chain.
I use these myself so they're pretty basic and should a block be solved the payout will be performed manually after coin maturation, but if there is enough interest I'll write up a frontend and automate this stuff later. The one who solves the block gets 99% of the block award and transaction fee's.
Bitcoin Solo Pool
Host: stratum+tcp://202.164.16.89:3333#xnsub Username: . Password: x 
Bitcoin Cash Solo Pool
Host: stratum+tcp://202.164.16.89:4433#xnsub Username: . Password: x 
Both pools are configured to create as large a block as possible (Max weight of 4MB for BTC, and Max Size of 8MB for BCH).
submitted by bundabrg to btc [link] [comments]

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In addition to PPS and PPLNS payout schemes, there are other less popular payout options such as solo mining and PROP mining. Mining pools have become an integral part of Bitcoin and ... New bitcoin mining website 2020, how to make money online 2020. site link https://zee.gl/CjsRpah Top high paying 100% trusted bitcoin cloud mining websites links. in addition to pps and pplns payout schemes there are other less popular payout options such as solo mining and prop mining. choosing the right pool to mine on - crypto beginners guide #4 ... But re-doing the math I can see where we may never even earn back the $69 we spent on our Bitcoin miner. The only real chance to make money with these virtual currencies is to get a new, more ... Going over what I am mining and my payouts. Week 53 - Mining Payouts 3/01/20 ... How Much Can You Make Mining Bitcoin With 6X 1080 Ti Beginners Guide - Duration: 19:20. How Much? 1,740,843 views ...

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