Do CoinJoins Really Require Equal Transaction Amounts for

Bylls — the Canadian Bitcoin bill payment service by Bull Bitcoin — celebrates its 6th birthday

I sometimes find it hard to believe that it has already been 6 years since the public launch of Bylls on January 13 2014. What started out as a simple and humble “garage startup”, the world’s first Bitcoin bill payment service, evolved into so much more.
Bylls eventually became the company that people know today as Bull Bitcoin, and it is from Bylls’ UASF advocacy that sprouted the Cyphernode open-source project. I also like to think of Bylls as a “bitcoin culture” institution that served as the vanguard of the Bitcoin Maximalist and Cypherpunk movements within the Bitcoin exchange and payments industry.
Happy Birthday Bylls! 🎂

What is Bylls?

For those of you who don’t know about Bylls, here’s a short summary:

Short history of world’s first Bitcoin bill payment service

Bylls was founded in 2013 by Eric Spano, a Montreal entrepreneur part of the original Bitcoin Embassy team. Eric, one of my earliest and most influential mentors, is a true Bitcoin OG. Check out his 2014 Bitcoin Ted Talk or his 2019 Podcast on Tales From the Crypt which describes in great detail the inception of Bylls.
When Bylls was launched, I was Public Affairs Director at the Bitcoin Embassy, the world’s first physical Bitcoin hub (a 14,000 square feet building downtown Montreal). Bylls was effectively a one-man operation, with Eric doing pretty much everything himself. I wasn’t directly involved with the company, but Bylls was one of the startups in the Embassy’s incubator program, so I was helping out in various ways. My first “public appearance” in the Bitcoin industry was actually to man the Bylls booth at the Toronto Bitcoin Expo in 2014!
In 2015, Eric was offered a huge career opportunity that he couldn’t accept without stepping down from running Bylls. It was to me an inconceivable tragedy for Bitcoin to let Bylls quitely close down. For the past 2 years, whenever somebody asked me “what can you do with Bitcoin?”, I would always reply “well, for starters, you can pay all your bills in Canada, even your taxes and your credit card”. What was I going to say now?
I had just founded my company Satoshi Portal Inc. with the aim of developing a non-custodial Bitcoin exchange (which eventually became Bull Bitcoin). And so, I acquired Bylls from Eric and it immediately became the focus of all my energy. For the first year, our team consisted of only 2 people including our lead developer Arthur which is still working on Bylls features to this day. From the beginning until today, we are still 100% self-funded. We grew organically and slowly. My philosophy on entrepreneurship and startup scaling is articulated in this medium post.It has been an incredibly intense journey. I cannot think of a more challenging professional experience than being a startup founder and entrepreneur in the Bitcoin industry. The number of Bitcoin startups that have perished since is a stark reminder. Some of them sank quietly, but many went down in flames taking down their users with them. The fact that Bylls is still standing — without VC funding and with its reputation intact — is my proudest achievement.
Over the past 4 years. we completely redesigned the software, continuously adding new features, but the core of the service remained the same. Most importantly, we added the ability for users to pay any individual or business in Canada by creating a personal biller from their bank details. Previously, they were limited to Bylls’ biller list of around 9000 billers.
One of the defining moments in the history of Bylls was UASF. Bylls was one of the first Bitcoin companies to support BIP-148 for the activation of Segwit (second after Bitconic). Not only that, but we were the first to run a public BIP-148 block explorer and public UASF electrum server. We had done a “seppuku pledge” regarding BIP-148, meaning that we would only accept coins from the UASF segwit chain and would pay the Bitcoin market price for them. If UASF had failed, we would not have survived. This cemented our ideology of “skin-in-the-game”. We would never compromise on our values, no matter the cost. Our policy on forks (2017) was described here. But the jist of it is:
Satoshi Portal is a Bitcoin-only company and does not conduct any transaction in any altcoin, including altcoins that are the result of a fork of the Bitcoin blockchain and which can be spent with Bitcoin private keys. This includes, but is not limited to, the coins commonly referred to as BCash, Segwit2X, BGold, Clams and Lumens.We strongly oppose the “New York Agreement” and will under no circumstance ever recognize the Segwit2X blockchain (and BTC1 client) as Bitcoin, regardless of market response or hashing power. In the unlikely event that an overwhelming majority of the Bitcoin ecosystem migrates to the Segwit2X blockchain, Satoshi Portal will continue nevertheless to support the Bitcoin blockchain.
Following the UASF/NO2X “war” in 2017, we devoted a large prortion of ressources to building Cyphernode, an open-source project that makes it very easy for startups to build and deploy Bitcoin applies without any third-parties, using exclusively their own full nodes. We are still developing this project today and plan on actively maintaining it in the future.
It is also worth noting that Bylls has never accepted any altcoins and was one of the first company to pledge never to accept altcoins in the future, leading to what became the “Bitcoin-Only” movement. We were also the first Bitcoin exchange and payment processing company, to our knowledge, that has integrated coinjoin as part of its processes.

Unbanking yourself with Bylls

The coolest feature of Bylls is that you can pay pretty much all your expenses with Bitcoin without needing to go through a bank account. In Canada, you can obtain a credit card without having it linked to a bank account. In 2016, the last of my personal bank accounts was closed due to my activities in the Bitcoin industry. I decided not apply at another bank and try the experiment of living completely unbanked. I’m happy to report it was a success, and serves as a powerful testament for the use-cases provided by Bylls.
I really like the idea of not owning any fiat. You can pay pretty much all daily expenses with a credit card, and pay back the debt with Bitcoin. Of course you have fiat-denominated debts which conveniently tends to diminish in price over time.
You can withdraw cash from a credit card and pay it off instantly with Bylls, so you can get access to cash at any time, in any country across the world, without having a bank account. The only inconvenience is the cash advance fee.
When you have to pay larger amounts such as rent or whatever services don’t accept cash or credit card, you can find the biller in the Bylls list or ask the recipient for his banking details, the same as you would for a wire transfer.

The future of Bylls

Many people ask us if we intend to expand outside of Canada. The answer is, unequivocally, no. We will always be a Canada-only, Bitcoin-only company. That doesn’t mean that we stop working hard to improve our services. We will continue to be the first to integrate the cutting-edge Bitcoin technologies that
Here is are some of the features you can expect in 2020:
Thanks for reading! 🎂
Yours truly,
Francis
Original post here: https://medium.com/bull-bitcoin/bylls-the-canadian-bitcoin-bill-payment-service-by-bull-bitcoin-celebrates-its-6th-birthday-ef6d22acdf2a
submitted by FrancisPouliot to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

TOP 3 Anonymous Cryptocurrencies

TOP 3 Anonymous Cryptocurrencies
Last year Bitfury’s multidisciplinary Blockchain specialists announced the possibility of revealing the identities of more than 16% of all owners of Bitcoin addresses. Several years ago, a team of CryptoLux developers, having conducted a study of transaction privacy on the Bitcoin network, concluded that 60% of all addresses can be deanonymized. Summarizing all this, it’s worth highlighting three existing methods that can successfully deanonymize private transactions.

Clustering

The easiest way to cluster (link Bitcoin addresses) is by analyzing transactional networks. In other words, this is a method that allows finding several inputs combined in one transaction. The second clustering method is “distribution analysis”. It allows calculation the percentage of cryptocurrency at the certain address that comes from another specific address and it becomes clear whether these addresses are connected by one direct transaction or a chain of transactions or not.

Graph analysis

It consists of quantitative and temporal analyzes. Quantitative analysis studies not certain transactions, but amounts. Time analysis tracks specific periods.

Memory Pool Method

When a transaction is made through the user’s wallet, the input nodes send information about the transaction to the Blockchain network. The purpose of this method is to identify the set of input nodes through the wallet and the user. In this case, the IP address of the client can be associated with its transactions. There are certain private cryptocurrency-leaders which are popular and trusted among users. Using one feature-privacy, they have different ways of functioning.

Basic principles of work: anonymous cryptocurrencies (Monero, Dash, Zcash)

Monero

The platform focuses on privacy and decentralization. The coin uses three levels of protection:
• Ring signatures, that hide the origin of the sender by mixing the user’s address with the addresses of other group members. • Ring confidential transactions, which hide the amount of the transaction. • Stealth addresses, that allow a user to hide the recipient’s address.
Such way guarantees the privacy of the sender and the recipient. Monero can be bought on Poloniex, Bitfinex, Livecoin, and Kraken crypto exchanges. It is possible to store Monero via an online wallet. More secure is its computer wallet. Due to its privacy, the popularity of the coin is expected to grow, so it makes sense to add a coin to an investment portfolio.
Advantages
• Increased privacy. Cryptocurrency is suitable for those who are afraid of deanonymizing network transactions. • Unlimited and difficult mining. • It takes less time to find blocks. • Resistance to the centralization of mining capacities.
Disadvantages
• Resources. All currency protection technologies require impressive machine performance for normal operation. The Monero block size is constantly growing, and this requires additional resources of network participants. • The popularity in the dark web leads to problems in working with regulatory authorities, exchanges often delist it. Speaking of reputation, Monero’s reputation is far from the best. The coin is often used on the dark web as payment for various illegal services. It happens to almost all crypto coins that provide privacy. • Large transaction sizes. Since Monero Blockchain is five times larger than the Bitcoin Blockchain in terms of one transaction. • Problems with scalability.

Dash

The Dash platform is a classic decentralized Blockchain-based payment system and the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. It implements multi-off-chain money transfers without loss of reliability and overall security of the Blockchain. Its confidentiality is rather an additional option that can be used optionally. In the case of anonymity, it is possible to send a hidden transaction, but at a more expensive cost, which also requires additional time. Dash developed a hashing algorithm with eleven cryptographic functions-X 11 for the first time. The coin developers have released apps for other platforms. Today it is possible to use Dash for IOS, Zeal for Linux, LovelyDocs for Android and Velocity for Windows.
As well known, the CoinJoin is an anonymization method for crypto transactions, which is used by Dash as an improved version called the PrivateSend. Its mixing sessions are limited to 1,000 DASH for each session and will require multiple mixing sessions to anonymize a large amount of money.
Advantages
• High transaction speed. It is achieved via InstantX technology, which enables the confirmation of operations in less than 4 seconds. • Law transaction fees. • Energy consumption. Unlike Monero, it does not require a lot of power or high commission costs.
Disadvantages
• “Transparency” of the network. Without triggering the “mixing” mechanism, the directions of transactions and their balances are publicly visible to everyone. • Lack of proper cryptographic technologies that provide privacy, but can provide a sufficiently high level of protection. • Transaction visibility to the founders and the team.

Zcash

An open-source decentralized cryptocurrency that provides users with maximum privacy. Zcash is the first private cryptocurrency, using cryptographic protocol zk-SNARKS, a zero-knowledge security layer. It allows users to make hidden and open transactions.
Mathematically guaranteed privacy is something cryptocurrency can not be proud of. This fact makes the currency specific. All Zcash coins are identical, it means that interchangeable coins do not contain information about past use created. In this regard, the connection of coins with their history on the Blockchain is broken, which makes them universal and identical to each other. Zcash blocks are generated 4 times faster than Bitcoin. The currency trades on Huobi, Bitfinex and Binance exchanges, and after purchase, it can be stored on the exchange’s internal wallet, as well as transferred to Jaxx, Cryptonator and Coinomi multi-currency wallets. Coins can also be stored on hardware wallets like Ledger and Trezor.
Advantages
• Privacy. Since no information except the time stamp, is recorded in the Blockchain, transactions cannot be tracked, and the identity of the sender and recipient is almost impossible to establish. • Interchangeability. Due to interchangeability, all coins have a “clean” history. This means that it is practically impossible to determine which transactions coin was used. • Security. Lack of information about user keys, which protects user wallets and the network.Mining energy efficiency. Zcash mining hardware consumes less electricity than Bitcoin mining ASICs. • The difficulty of mining. Zcash is beneficial for those who want to get coins for block creation. Bitcoin mining becomes more and more complicated, so miners cannot earn enough money via their computers with high capacity.
Disadvantages
• 6 users can decide to leave the transferred data completely open. • It takes a lot of calculations to complete a transaction. • Insecurity. There are fears that the system could be hacked, or users may accidentally open the data. • Legally ZCash is supported only by Linux, however, it provides users with wallets for other platforms: Jaxx, Ledger, Trezor, Trust, Zecwallet, Ibitcome, Exodus, Guarda, Coinomi, Cobowallet, and Bitgo.
Private cryptocurrencies are necessary for anyone who values the privacy and confidentiality of financial transactions. Privacy can generate more value, than danger, as Eric Hughes says: “Privacy is necessary for an open society in the electronic age. Privacy is not secrecy. A private matter is something one doesn’t want the whole world to know, but a secret matter is something one doesn’t want anybody to know. Privacy is the power to selectively reveal oneself to the world”.
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

Anonymity & Cryptocurrency: A Few Tips On How To Keep Your Privacy

Unfortunately, anonymity isn’t something that you think about as being valuable. But as Edward Snowden points out in one of his interviews, “Arguing that you don’t care about the right to privacy because you have nothing to hide is no different than saying you don’t care about free speech because you have nothing to say.”
https://preview.redd.it/a2t5wii1wnj41.png?width=1024&format=png&auto=webp&s=df6889e510a2a0b231614636d0b6c1ac7be7e2c4
Many people are going up against online anonymity, mainly because it has the potential to enable and encourage undesirable behavior or illegal activity. State institutions and corporations are trying to limit the ability to use networks without authorization, allegedly in an attempt to increase security.
Meanwhile, there is no doubt that private information that falls into the wrong hands can be used for mean purposes in many ways. Dozens of examples truly highlight the need for online anonymity today. Without it, people’s lives can easily be ruined forever.
Financial and personal freedom are the main reasons why people started using cryptocurrencies. But using Bitcoin itself can not guaranty anonymity. They are not linked to a person or identity, so the name, e-mail or physical address can’t be found in the transaction. But public addresses we use publically recorded on the blockchain, so a person can be tracked down using this information and ID.
Here are some methods to keep your identity safe.
Use logless VPN
Virtual Private Network encrypts all of your Internet traffic and routes it through multiple servers at different locations before arriving at the final location. Using a VPN is one of the simplest ways to cover your digital tracks. Logless VPN services don’t store the history of your activities, some of them provide one IP address for several users, making it difficult to isolate one person among them.
It is highly recommended to avoid US/UK-based VPN services due to strict surveillance regimes in these countries.
Also, you should keep in mind that some exchangers’ security systems treating logging into an account with numerous different country IPs as suspicious which can lead to blocking your account.
Register a separate email
Never use personal or working email for the needs of the crypto. If hackers gain access to it that can ruin your life in many aspects at once.
A significant advantage will be the use of burner emails such as Guerrilla Mail and Temp Mail, or highly protected services like ProtonMail or Tutanota.
Don’t forget about common security rules such as using a strong password that contains different case letters, numbers and symbols. Keeping passwords and keys on your devices is definitely not safe, better write it down in an old-fashioned pen-paper way.
Create new blockchain address
Make new addresses for every single transaction you make. More than half of all transactions in the BTC network go through wallets that have been in use at least once. Over time this practice will build up a list of transactions associated with one wallet. Using some manipulations those transactions could be easily associated with a real-world identity as well as your wallet could be simply hacked and robbed.
Avoid KYC and AML using services
Know Your Client is a policy used by many companies in which each client is required to provide credentials such as ID documents to use a company’s service. Anti-Money Laundry consists of KYC procedures and ongoing risk assessment and monitoring of transactions. Such actions are implemented in the best interest of protecting users of cryptocurrency platforms but left no chance to stay anonymous.
Nowadays most of the crypto markets and exchanges require passing identity verification due to the growing control from the state institutions. However, there are some that allow you to remain anonymous unless you are withdrawing a large amount (Binance, Bitfinex, KuCoin, etc.). In such circumstances, decentralized exchanges seem like a good option.
Use Anonymity-Centric Cryptocurrencies
As mentioned earlier, blockchain analysis based on knowledge of the amount and time of the sent transaction allows hackers to attack user’s wallets and gain access to their data. As a reaction to this was developing coins with anonymity as the main priority.
At the moment, Monero is the most popular of the anonymity-centric cryptocurrencies. It has a complex of cryptographical tools for obfuscating traces of the original transaction. Its RingCT Protocol hides the sender, recipient and transfers amounts. After the transaction is completed, it is signed and receives a time-stamp using a ring signature, where collected group’s public keys, but the private key of the specific sender is not displayed.
Another private currency’s Dash work is based on the CoinJoin technology. The idea of the process is very simple: several transactions are mixed into one, so it is impossible to determine what amounts were transferred and by whom.
Zcash currency uses the Zero-Knowledge Proof commitment scheme to validate transactions without revealing information about them. Protocol, called Zk-SNARKs, comprises three algorithms that generate proof and verification keys, calculate the proof and verify the authenticity of the secret information. The obvious drawback of this mechanism is extremely massive complex calculations that require enormous capacity.
Even if complete anonymity seems not possible, following the above rules will help you avoid a lot of trouble.
You should be extra meticulous in the process of choosing currency and an exchanger, keeping in mind where and what personal information you provide.
If you need to exchange your coins private and without registration – StealthEX is here for you. Just go to http://stealthex.io and choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. Then follow these easy steps:
✔ Choose the pair and the amount for your exchange. For example ETH to BTC.
✔ Press the “Start exchange” button.
✔ Provide the recipient address to which the coins will be transferred.
✔ Move your cryptocurrency for the exchange.
✔ Receive your coins.
Follow us on Medium, Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit to get StealthEX.io updates and the latest news about the crypto world. For all requests message us via [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
submitted by Stealthex_io to StealthEX [link] [comments]

User Guide, FAQ and 10 Commandments

Dear Wasabikas,
Thank you all for taking the time to consider your privacy, and welcome to the community. This post is a guide for using Wasabi and should be read before reaching out for help. Currently Wasabi Support accepts questions in the following languages: English, Spanish (español), French (français), Russian (Русский), Italian (italiano) and Hungarian (magyar).
Our support team now has a dedicated PGP key set:
PGP Fingerprint: 30FE 98B2 6219 2F35 72BB 9C6D F8FC B536 5407 1408
You may choose to ask for help more discretely through DM, or perhaps you have sensitive information that you may need to share. We recommend encrypting data against the support key, however you may choose to encrypt messages against any of the following keys you trust (you may also encrypt against several keys).

After you have looked through the commandments, please check out our FAQ written by 6102bitcoin, and our community built documentation: https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi/blob/masteWalletWasabi.Documentation/FAQ.md https://docs.wasabiwallet.io/

The Ten Commandments

1 - Wasabi is for defense only

2 - Verify the integrity of your software

Wasabi Wallet is an open-source project with many contributors. When downloading the wallet, you may chose to go to the official site or to the official GitHub to build from source. Wasabi is available at our official site:
https://wasabiwallet.io/ (Clear-net)
http://wasabiukrxmkdgve5kynjztuovbg43uxcbcxn6y2okcrsg7gb6jdmbad.onion
Please check signatures after completing downloads, the concern here is that you may accidentally fall for a phishing attempt and be on a malicious site downloading a malicious piece of software.
Alternatively, you may also build the code from source here, instructions are available here:
https://github.com/zkSNACKs/WalletWasabi

3 - Keep your mnemonic words and password safely stored (BOTH!)

When creating a new wallet - write down your mnemonic seed AND password and store those safely. Wasabi is a fully non-custodial wallet, which means that should always be in possession of your keys, and this means safely storing a backup in case your computer is lost or the wallet crashes. Often times when things go wrong, users panic. If you have done this step, there is very little you have to worry about. Also, under no circumstance should you reveal the password or mnemonic words to anyone that asks for them. Lastly, understand that if you lose your password, it becomes much harder (if not impossible) to restore your wallet - so store both safely!

4 - Practice good labeling AND try to never reuse addresses

Each time you receive coins, you will be asked to create a label. This label is only for you and is stored exclusively on your device. Wasabi has strong coin control features, and as you continue to use the wallet, you will observe that the history of your coins will appear, and this history is only useful to you if you are practicing good labeling. An example of a good label:
June 20 - $400 from Coinbase, primary account
June 7 - 0.2 BTC Received from Bob via Bisq
Examples of bad labels:
Address #1
0.5 BTC
Lastly, if you must use an exchange, try to ask for a new deposit address on each deposit. In the same way that you should never receive Bitcoin to the same address twice, you should try to avoiding sending Bitcoin to the same address twice.

5 - CoinJoin whenever possible and be patient!

The process of engaging in a CoinJoin is as simple as selecting a coin or coins to en-queue and entering your password. Once coins have en-queued for CoinJoining, you must keep your computer online and awake, as the CoinJoin process is interactive. As a coinjoin is really just many users (up to 100) en-queuing coins at the same time, it may take up to two hours for you to successfully participate in a CoinJoin and clean outputs should only be spent once the CoinJoin transaction is confirmed. For context, Wasabi currently does 18 CoinJoins a day, or roughly one every 1 hour and 20 minutes. As more users join the network, the frequency of these CoinJoins will go up. Lastly, if you are able and patient enough to re-mix your coins, please do so. Re-mixing coins is nearly free and greatly encouraged!

6 - Use separate profiles

When you put a label on an address, or ask a question on this Reddit or send coins to a merchant be wary of the profile you choose. If you can create a dummy Reddit account as opposed to an account where you may have revealed your personal details elsewhere - use that. When you spend coins from your wallet, consider what you might want to keep private from the merchant or individual you are interacting with. In the same way that reusing addresses hurts your privacy, consolidating all of your online behavior into one profile can do the same.

7 - Never merge mixed and unmixed coins, and avoid large merges of mixed coins!

The first part should be somewhat intuitive - coins in your wallet have shields (red, yellow, green and green +) and it is at a minimum important to never send non-red coins (coins with anonset > 1) with red coins (coins with anonset == 1). By merging your tainted coins with your mixed coins, you undo the privacy benefits of CoinJoins! Further, when sending mixed coins to your cold storage, make sure to send your coins in parallel. Don't merge all of your Bitcoin (more than 0.8 BTC) in a single transaction! Instead, take your time and send coins to multiple addresses belong to your cold storage over a few hours or days. If you are sending coins to an exchange, you can get the same result by requesting a brand new address to receive coins.
For more information, please see the discussions here: https://www.reddit.com/WasabiWallet/comments/avxbjy/combining_mixed_coins_privacy_megathread/

8 - Avoid 3rd party servers & Buy Bitcoin P2P

Wasabi is designed to allow users to see their balances without any concern that a third party would be able to link your addresses to you, or to each other. Very few wallets can say this, but if you proceed to enter your address into a block explorer, or use a third party wallet with your keys or your hardware device - all bets are off. So if you want to check on the status of a transaction or the balance on an address, you should first:
(a) Check your Wasabi Wallet
(b) Check through your full node
(c) Use a block explorer through Tor (e.g. Blockstream.info T address)
If you think that forensics companies are not paying big money to block explorers for user information, you are wrong. Even something as simple as leaving a comment on a YouTube video or Reddit post will be scraped.
More importantly, if you are using a hardware wallet, an easy way to undo the previous times you plugged in the wallet through non-private applications is to create a new account on the device with a passphrase. For example, for ledger nano s, you can do this in the device home screen > security > passphrase. Remember Commandment 2!
Remember, Bitcoin is a peer-to-peer cash system, so when you have the opportunity to do so, buy your coins directly from someone you know or through a P2P market place. Not only will this benefit your privacy, it will save you on exchange fees and potential insolvency issues with the exchange you are dealing with.

9 - Run your own full node (if you can)

Wasabi will work just fine without a local full node on your device, however, if you can spare the resources on your device, running a full node will do that much more for your privacy. Local full nodes will (when running in tandem with Wasabi) be automatically used for querying blocks.

10 - Use Lightning

Wasabi is an ideal wallet for many things, but trade-offs exist with everything. If you have small amounts of un-mixed change from previous CoinJoins and you are unable to meet the requirements to engage in a COinJoin, consider using that coin to open a lightning channel. Lightning is still a project in its' early days, but the privacy topology of lightning payments is much more ideal over on-chain payments if you have the choice. Routing large amounts can be uncertain, but for small amounts the network is becoming steadily more reliable. Currently Wasabi does not support in-wallet lightning features, but it is on the road-map.

Credits

Much of this list comes from the work of our good friends at JoinMaket. In particular, we need to thank Adam Gibson (u/waxwing) and Chris Belcher (u/belcher_) for their outstanding contribution to privacy in Bitcoin. Please take a look at https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Privacy , https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/JoinMarket and the github https://github.com/JoinMarket-Org.
Edited (July 22) - Changed Commandment 7 to reflect merging theory from past months. Moved "Buy Bitcoin P2P" to commandment 8. Edited (August 5) - Added documentation page ( https://docs.wasabiwallet.io/ )
submitted by iLoveStableCoins to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Common beginner's questions -- Sending and Receiving BTC from a BItcoin.com Wallet to my Wasabi Wallet.

I am a novice in all aspects of purchasing, anonymizing, wallet storage, wallet-to-wallet sending and receiving, etc. At this point, I have successfully purchased some BTC through a very conventional online process... paying a hefty 10% processing fee! They required full ID verification, so my fingerprints are all over the BTC that are now in my "Bitcoin.com Wallet" that resides as an app on my Mac. I want to sanitize this BTC and thought I'd be able to do so by sending it from my "Bitcoin Wallet" to my "Wasabi" wallet (Tor is running, Backend is connected, Peers: 8, Price: $6225). So I chose the Load Wallet operation in my "Wasabi" wallet and it generated an address. I thought I'd be able to "Send" all my BTC from my "Bitcoin.com Wallet" to my "Wasabi" wallet by entering the Wasabi-generated address in the "Send" screen of the "Bitcoin" Wallet, but the address seems to be basically ignored and the "Bitcoin" wallet seems to only allow me to "Transfer" BTC from one "Bitcoin" wallet to another "Bitcoin" wallet within the same wallet app on my Mac. I thought that by "Sending" the BTC from the "Bitcoin" wallet and "Receiving" it in my "Wasabi" wallet, it would be sanitized... or that I would at least be able to use CoinJoin built into Wasabi to anonymize my BTC in my Wasabi wallet. I seem to be lacking a lot of instructive and pertinent information about this whole process of purchasing and anonymizing BTC... but at this point, I'd like to start by learning how to move my "dirty" BTC from my Bitcoin wallet to my Wasabi wallet. Thanks to anyone willing to take the time to help me. I've got a lot to learn.
submitted by techninaut to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

/u/cointastical on Hiding shit from the goverment

Bitcoin Anonymity Guide 2019: How to use BTC like a straight up G - https://medium.com/@rickytheghost1981/bitcoin-anonymity-guide-2019-how-to-use-btc-like-a-straight-up-g-e3bf55f680fa
Other articles:
Privacy articles:
COINJOIN:
WasabiWallet Coinjoin - https://github.com/6102bitcoin/FAQ/blob/mastewasabi.md
Samourai Whirlpool
JoinMarket:
Wallet local servers:
submitted by highhighhopes101 to TalkativePeople [link] [comments]

Forkdrop.io Weekly Digest 2018-07-05

https://forkdrop.io and follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/forkdrop
We will be attending the Bitcoin Rodeo http://bitcoinrodeo.com/ in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on Monday and Tuesday next week. If anyone else is attending, give us a ping and we would love to meet up and say hello.
Forks: 114 ( Bitcoin: 74 Altcoin: 19 Historic: 21) - Exchanges: 90
News:
  1. Bitcoin Gold (BTG) had their hard fork to change their PoW algorithm. Is now Equihash-BTG instead of plain Equihash which is still GPU-friendly. This is to address Bitmain's ASICs for Equihash, but also the recent concerns about 51% attacks. The new algo requires 2.5 GB RAM to run efficiently. This should not affect bitcoin_fork_claimer's support for creating BTG transactions. https://bitcoingold.org/equihash-btg/
  2. Bitcoin Interest (BCI) is reporting that they are experiencing 51% attacks. They have or will be reverting the chain 180 blocks and coordinating with the exchanges. They are preparing a new code release in the new future with a hard fork to the transaction format to fix the previously-noted replay attack issues - this will require a patch to bitcoin_fork_claimer to continue working.
  3. There is an unmerged PR for offline transaction signing on bitcoin_fork_claimer https://github.com/ymgve/bitcoin_fork_claimepull/61
Random News:
  1. Building on Bitcoin conference was this week. All great stuff, but a few recommended talks relevant to privacy/anonymity: u/nopara73's talk on ZeroLink and Wasabi Wallet: https://youtu.be/XORDEX-RrAI?t=1026 Also, Adam Gibson's talk on CoinJoin and some of the concepts in mixing and defeating chainalaysis was very informative: https://youtu.be/XORDEX-RrAI?t=23399 Giulia Fanti's presentation on Dandilion is an extremely clear explanation of the proposal and distinction from Onion routing solutions: https://youtu.be/XORDEX-RrAI?t=27278 (we haven't yet watched Day 2, I am sure there is great talks to recommend there)
Updates:
submitted by forkdrop to BitcoinAirdrops [link] [comments]

DASH ELI5 | Bullet Point Format

Difference between DASH and Bitcoin
Dash Masternode Network
Deterministic ordering
Trustless Quorums
Masternode Protocol
Cold mode
PrivateSend
InstantSend
Dash Updates/Improvements
Click here for the article with better formatting.
Let me know me if I forgot something important. Crititsm is appriciated!
submitted by sajet007 to dashpay [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Kidnappings and Ransoms

Will kidnapping become a problem in a Bitcoin world? Especially with this recent talk of implementing anonymous transactions?
The bank and cash world, as it stands, makes it very difficult to be a kidnapper. It takes days for a wire transfer to settle. And if you ask for cash, it needs to be exchanged physically.
Bitcoin solves this "problem" for ransom kidnappers. They can request money sent to an address, and never expose themselves. If we implement anonymous transactions, depending on the implementation, they can get away with anything.
Is anyone worried about this?
submitted by Fragsworth to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Link Collection - All Recent Core Team Communications (incl. Roadmap)

Last updated: Mar 29th, 2018

2 important things first:

General Note

Table of contents

  1. Communications
  2. Guides & Instructional links
  3. Key people to follow on Twitter
  4. Dash Core is hiring
  5. Quarterly Summaries
  6. Notable Core Team Proposals
  7. Dash Whitepapers
  8. Dash Technology Peer-reviewed
  9. Addendum: Misconceptions on Dash cleared up

Communications

  1. The birth of Dash's Governance: Self-sustainable Decentralized Governance by Blockchain
  2. 'We're Doing the Planning That Takes Us to 1 Billion" - Ryan Taylor, Dash Director of Finance
  3. The philosophy behind the DASH reward split by (now) Dash Core CEO Ryan Taylor
  4. Dash's Ryan Taylor at TNABC Bitcoin Miami 2017 (Best presentation on Dash so far!)
  5. What is DASH & Where Is It Going? 2017 DASH Open House
  6. Hong Kong | Research and Planning - by Evan Duffield
  7. Dash Roadmap to Evolution
  8. How To Enable On-Chain Scaling by Evan Duffield
  9. DFN - Interview with Evan on Dash's Roadmap
  10. Open Letter From Evan and Ryan Regarding Dash Marketing
  11. Wachsman PR - Q2 project closure report
  12. Interview With The Crypto Show! - Evan Duffield
  13. Dash Improvement Proposal No. 1 - DIP001
  14. Important information regarding wallet backups
  15. Dash Labs Network Update
  16. Copay Wallet going into closed Alpha Testing
  17. 1st Annual Dash Conference: London Keynote Professional HQ Recording
  18. DASH – DIGITAL CASH by Robert Wiecko at SWITCH! 2017
  19. Crucial information to all proposal owners: Do NOT use multisig addresses as payout destinations!
  20. Interview With Ryan Taylor, The CEO Of Dash Core Team
  21. Ryan Taylor at the World Blockchain Forum
  22. Ryan Taylor interview with Crypto Trader (MSNBC Africa)
  23. Dash Core Community Update
  24. Dash Core 12.2 Release
  25. Dash CEO Ryan Taylor: „Dash is in many ways a better Bitcoin“
  26. Update from Dash Core on Business Development
  27. How DASH is resistant to retargeting issues
  28. Dash presentation at the Euro Finance Tech in Frankfurt by essra
  29. Link collection of Dash's 2017 achievements
  30. What Is a DAO and Why Is It Revolutionary?
  31. Dash: The First DAO
  32. Welcome Bradley Zastrow - Director of Global Business Development
  33. Interview with Ryan Taylor, IR4 Podcast #12 (January 2018)
  34. Chuck Williams at Anarchapulco 2018 on Dash
  35. Dash Force Podcast E42 with Chuck Williams on Dash Evolution
  36. Evolution Demo #1 - The First Dash DAP
  37. Dash Force Podcast E43 - Feat. Fernando Gutierrez (Dash Core CMO)
  38. Our New Approach to Communications with the Community
  39. Dash Community Q&A - March 29th, 2018

Guides & Instructional links

  1. Dash Developer Documentation
  2. Upgrade Instructions for Masternodes (12.2)
  3. Upgrade Instructions for End Users (12.2)
  4. Upgrade Instructions for Masternodes (12.1)
  5. Upgrade Instructions for End Users (12.1)
  6. Paper Wallet Setup Guide
  7. Trezor Guide for Masternode Operators
  8. 8 Steps to a Successful Proposal
  9. Masternode Boot Camp by solarguy2003
  10. DASH 101 Video Series

Key people to follow on Twitter

  1. Ryan Taylor, CEO of Dash Core Inc.
  2. Fernando Gutierrez, CMO of Dash Core Inc.
  3. Bradley Zastrow, Chief of Business Development at Dash Core Inc.
  4. Andy Freer, CTO of Dash Core Inc.
  5. Chuck Williams, Head of UX Development at Dash Core Inc.
  6. Robert Wiecko, PM of Dash Core Inc.
  7. Joel Valenzuela, Dash Force
  8. Mark Mason, Dash Force
  9. Amanda B. Johnson
  10. Scott Farnsworth, The Dash Racer

Dash Core is hiring!

  1. Internship at Dash Labs
  2. DashLabs - Trezor Engineer
  3. GPU Accelerator Project
  4. DevOps Engineer @ Dash
  5. Infrastructure Manager @ Dash
  6. Sr. Backend Developer Role @ Dash

2017 Quarterly Summaries from Dash Core

  1. Dash Core Team Q1 2017 Summary Call
  2. Dash Core Team Q2 2017 Summary Call
  3. Dash Core Team Q3 2017 Summary Call
  4. Dash Core Team Q4 2017 Summary Call

2016 Quarterly Summaries from Dash Core

  1. Q1 2016
  2. Q2 2016
  3. Q3 2016
  4. Q4 2016

Notable Core Team proposals:

  1. Dash sponsored Blockchain Research in Arizona State University
  2. Conferences - The Trading Show
  3. Money 20/20 in London
  4. Conferences - BTC & Blockchain International Summit
  5. Dash Conference 2017 (London)
  6. Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference (Stockholm)

Dash Whitepapers

  1. Original Dash Whitepaper
Note: Previously the Evolution Whitepapers were linked in this section. These papers were written back in 2015 and are outdated, because Dash Evolution has seen a massive re-design and has been developed much further than those papers could have predicted. A new version will be posted here and elsewhere as soon as it is available.

Dash Technology Peer-reviewed

  1. Dash PrivateSend Peer Review by Kristov Atlas and Core Team's Response
  2. Dash Governance Peer Review by IOHK and Dash Core Team's Response

Addendum: Misconceptions on Dash cleared up

  1. What has Dash to offer other than features any other coin could just copy?
  2. InstantXploit? Cool Name, No Threat
  3. "Lazy Masternode" attack theory thoroughly debunked (see my comment)
  4. Hardware vs Software scaling - Why SegWit is not the savior of cryptocurrency
  5. How solid is PrivateSend, really? and Broken privacy promises vs Dash
  6. Dash has better wealth distribution than almost all top cryptos
  7. How is Dash NOT a ponzi scheme?
  8. PSA: DASH is not a CryptoNote clone - DashCOIN is
  9. Discussion/clarification on Dash's opensource approach
  10. Evil Masternode tyrants ruling over us?! and Masternodes in Dash = The rich get richer?
  11. Has Dash's development steadily declined over the past few months?
  12. The major advantage of optional privacy
  13. Ridiculous comments on Dash - by Kurt Robinson
  14. The Dash Masternode Network: A Response to Critics - by Eric Sammons
  15. Analysis of the first day in mining Dash by Ryan Taylor, (then) Director of Finance at Dash Core:
  16. How to Prevent the Hostile Takeover of a Blockchain: Eric Sammons on Dash Governance
  17. Official clarification on the "Instamine" issue (Fastmine actually)
  18. Evan Duffield has no more than 256,000 Dash and will give away 80% of that to fund DAOs within DASH. Follow-up: Part of the funds has already been used to found the Dash Labs research arm in Hong Kong. The lab is fully maintained through Duffield's private funding. No Treasury proposal for it exists.
  19. 10 Stupid Things People Say About Dash And How To Respond
  20. Sporks: One of the foundations of Dash's success
  21. There is no so called "Master Private Key" in Dash and there never has been. Sporks (explained above) have no relation to user funds, as the source code easily proves.
  22. Trolls vs. Users: The Limited Importance of Online Communities
  23. Dash PrivateSend and usage of denomination inputs
  24. Valuable link list from Dash Force member Mastermined
  25. "But Dash PrivateSend has a much smaller ambiguity set! Its privacy is broken!!!"
  26. Succinct refutation on Masternodes "artifically" blowing up the price & Evan Duffield being the only miner at launch
  27. Bitcoin Cash vs Dash
  28. "Dash rebranded from Darkcoin to distance itself from its dark history!!" -> Not at all. Nothing about its history is "dark" and more importantly this thread called "The Birth of Darkcoin" is stickied by Evan Duffield himself on the official main forum.
  29. "Evan Duffield lied about the launch time so he would get an unfair advantage at mining!" -> Quotes from the original launch thread on Bitcointalk: "Awesome! We'll be launching soon. Things are looking good." and "Launch is being moved to 11PM EST!". As the genesis block proves launch took place at 03:54:41 AM (UTC) on Jan. 19th, 2014 or 10:54:41 PM (EST), Jan. 18th, 2014. So if anything it was 5 minutes early.
  30. "But Litecoin is superior to Dash!!" - Really? Let's compare - Here's another sober look at the facts on this issue.
  31. Why Dash is not prone to cluster analysis attacks
  32. How "centralized" is Dash, really? & Which project is actually centralized here?
  33. From the day Dash started trading until late April 2014 anyone had the chance to buy Dash for less than 1 USD
  34. Dash Core developer MooCowMoo on alleged Masternode centralization and PrivateSend
  35. Why Masternodes have no incentive to vote in a proposal to pay themselves a large sum of Dash
  36. What is Dash's competitive edge?
  37. Why saying "Dash is a company" is false: Dash Core Inc., a company based in Scottsdale, Arizona is not the decentralized network called Dash. The network, consistent of over 4.5k globally distributed, decentralized Masternodes decided to hire and fund the company Dash Core Inc. to develop said network. This is the distinguishing property of Dash being a DAO, so it's understandable people have difficulty grasping the concept. Similarly Dash does not have a CEO, while Dash Core Inc. -obviously- has.
  38. Dash does not and never had a "dev tax": Dash has a Treasury and its distribution is being voted on each month. Only those funds that have been approved by the Masternode network go to proposal owners. The Treasury is capped at 10% of the accumulated block reward of one month. There is no central authority non-requested or non-approved funds go to and there never has been. Those funds are simply not created. So you can have months in which only 8% of the budget is being paid out, with the remaining 2% going to nobody due to not being mined.
  39. "B-but Evan Duffield can roll back the last 24 hours of the blockchain with the flick of a button!" Complete bullshit. The key in question refers to requiring a Masternode to re-validate its pre-existing blockchain in order to ensure it's on the right chain. Masternodes have nothing do with putting or removing transactions into or from the blockchain, only the miners can do that, thus claiming someone can "roll back the blockchain" in Dash is a malicious lie and a desperate attempt to make Dash look centralized when it's not. In short: No such button exists, ever existed or will ever exist.
  40. Why the total coin supply was changed or "The 84 million coin"-Question

General notes:

The Dash community is well aware that during most of its history this project has been under attack by competitors, many of which are trying to portray Dash (among many other things) as a failure. This is oxymoronic, because nobody hates on failures, especially not for 4 successful years in a row.
If you want a quick history lesson, here's a comment I made on where the Dash hate originated from back in 2014
Another, longer history lesson
Remain skeptical towards sensational accusations without evidence. Our community is helpful, knowledgeable and more than happy to answer any questions, as we have done many times on this subreddit. Still, we're all only human, have limited resources and we're just one project among many (always among the top, though!). Stakeholders and investors of other projects will always have an agenda to smear what they perceive as competition (I have yet to see our community actively go after other projects, though).
Just remember the Bullshit Asymmetry: "The amount of energy required to refute bullshit is at least an order of magnitude larger than to produce it." So it would be very unjust to expect a refutation on the spot all of the time. Prefer taking the initiative by asking the community directly about the claim you're confronted with. This community has proven many times to possess the integrity required to admit to technological shortcomings, but at the same time we'll never hesitate to call out illegitimate claims and accusations, of which there are many, for what they are.
The most common and most empty attack is "Dash is a scam".
More importantly you have to ask the critic just this one question: Who was scammed? The answer usually consists of complete silence or attempts to change the topic. This may sound all very defensive to someone who has never experienced the kind of FUD Dash has faced over the years, but the falsehoods we've refuted above are still being perpetuated by a very lonely but also very loud minority.

Not an ICO project

Regarding Dash's finances: Despite what many people assume influenced by the ICO insanity of the recent past, Dash did not have an ICO and Dash does not depend on 3rd party funding/investors. It is self funded from the blockchain and thus an entirely independent organization that does exactly what it wants, not what any angel investors want us to do. Dash is the first currency in history to achieve that.

Quick incomplete rundown of Dash's features

In fact Dash pioneered almost every single one of its features making it one of the most prolific innovators in the cryptocurrency space. Before Dash invented them, none of these features existed:
To re-iterate a previous point:
Dash has been copied by several dozen other projects either completely or through selected features indicating a strong approval of its technology within the wider cryptocurrency industry. The most copied feature by far is the Masternode system and the financial self-reliance it provides.
submitted by Basilpop to dashpay [link] [comments]

Bata Core 17.0.15 Released

Bata Core 17.0.15 has now been released and is available to download:
https://github.com/BTA-BATA/Bataoshi/releases
Or
https://bata.io
Bata Core 17.0 Release notes:
DIP0001 activation removed due to bug causing wallet shutdown - With SegWit already implemented from original Bitcoin wallet it was just unnecessary redundancy.
Core 0.17 Features:
Better Coin Selection And Output Handling
In straightforward terms, Core 0.17.0 is smarter about adding different transaction outputs together and managing the change output from those transactions.
Easier To Create And Use New Wallets
Core 0.17.0 also makes it easier to create and use new wallets. The first major wallet creation improvements date back to Bitcoin Core 0.15.0, which is when the client added the ability to create wallets that operate independently of one another. These independent wallets have their own separate bitcoin addresses and private keys, which effectively makes them two totally different wallets.
Up until now, however, new wallets could only be created when starting up a new node.
Scantxoutset Has Been Added
Core 0.17.0 adds a new feature called Scantxoutset, which lets users quickly verify whether a new wallet already includes coins.
This feature makes it easier to create independent wallets. With Scantxoutset, you can quickly determine if coins were transferred from another wallet by checking the unspent transaction output (UTXO) set. You don’t have to rescan the entire transaction history.
Non-HD To HD Wallet Upgrade
Bata Core has supported Hierarchical Deterministic wallet backups since Core 0.13.0. Since then, users have been able to backup multiple HD wallets with a single seed phrase (a list of words) instead of individually backing up all their private keys.
There was a small problem, though: Bata Core users who upgraded their system to Bata Core 0.13.0 and newer were unable to create new HD wallets. Because non-HD and HD wallets were incompatible, it meant users were still required to back up all their private keys and were unable to use the seed phrase backup for their HD wallets.
Now, with Core 0.17.0, things have changed, and these users can now upgrade to the HD format. Meanwhile, if you already have an HD wallet and are using Bata Core, you can now generate or import a new HD seed.
Watch-Only Wallets Where Every Address Is A Watch Only Address
Core 0.17.0 takes watch-only wallet addresses a step further than they’ve gone before. Under the old system, watch-only addresses could be used to display the balance of a wallet without actually holding the private keys. Users could easily accept payments and keep track of their funds while still storing private keys online.
Core 0.17.0 takes this a step further by allowing users to create watch only wallets where every address is a watch-only address.
The best way to use this system would be to keep track of funds in a hardware wallet or on a paper wallet in the form of an HD seed while using Bata Core.
Blockchain Pruning Helps Users Avoid Storing All Of Blockchain Data
New Bata Core users need to download and validate the complete Bata blockchain, which includes every transaction in bata’s history.
There’s no getting around downloading the whole blockchain. However, thanks to the new version of Bata Core, you don’t necessarily have to store all that data permanently.
A new trick in Bata Core 0.17.0 called blockchain pruning means users don’t actually have to store all this data. Blockchain pruning means nodes will automatically “forget” about older transaction data. They’ll only keep the data they need to operate securely.
Pruning mode isn’t new: it’s been available via the command line for several versions now. However, Bata Core 0.17.0 has introduced a GUI blockchain pruning tool that makes it easier to access – particularly for more casual, non-technical Bata Core users.
Partially Signed Bitcoin Transactions (PSBTs)
Finally, Core 0.17.0 introduces BIP 174, Partially Signed Bitcoin Transactions (PSBTs), to allow users to sign a transaction partially while also adding metadata to the partially signed transaction. This metadata can be used by someone else to complete the transaction.
A traditional blockchain transaction does not involve partial signatures: one user sends bitcoin to another user. The partial signature system, however, allows for more complex types of transactions, including multi-sig transactions where several users need to sign off on the transfer of funds. This partial signature system will also be used for privacy-focused CoinJoin transactions, where multiple users merge independent transactions into a single large transaction.
Plus more - visit github for more info.
submitted by pc888 to batamoney [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

Maybe you're here because you've received a tip on social media, or maybe you've just been hearing a lot recently about Bitcoin and are wondering what the big deal is? The following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little bit about its long term potential:
For lots of additional video resources check out the videos wiki page or /BitcoinTV . Peer-reviewed, research papers can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Lots of Bitcoin statistics can be found here.

Where can I buy bitcoins?

You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank account. A good list of exchanges sorted by region can be found on the exchanges wiki here.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Here are a couple useful sites [bitkoin.io, preev.com] that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use established companies which have secured wallets where they hold the bitcoins for you and provide insurance.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below.
Google Authenticator Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Tipping

Use ChangeTip.com (/changetip) for tipping people on Facebook, Reddit, Twitter, YouTube, Tumblr, Google+, GitHub, Slack and more! (you can even use custom monikers to tailor your tip to the discussion or add a bit of humor). Read more about ChangeTip at their reddit wiki.
Go to /FreeBits to get a few bits to practice with and then tip them forward. Go to /BitTippers to play games and solve riddles to earn your bits. Don't forget your flair!

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Store Product
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit and The Bitcoin Shop Search engines of online retailers accepting bitcoin with millions of results
Overstock and Rakuten Everything under the sun
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
NewEgg, TigerDirect and Dell For all your electronic needs
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky and 9flats For when you need to get away
BoltVM VPS service
Namecheap For new domain name registration
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Foodler and Takeaway Takeout delivered to your door!
HumbleBundle, Disco Melee, GreenmanGaming, and Coinplay.io For when you need to get your game on
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Shipnik Discounted USPS Priority & Express mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. UK residents can find a comprehensive directory of shops, pubs, websites and other places in the UK that accept bitcoins at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, Red Cross, Amnesty International, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.
Additional resources can also be found at TheBitcoinPage.com

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker to allow users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Fundraising

You can use Lighthouse to crowdsource fundraising initiatives with bitcoin. It's similar to Kickstarter, but without intermediaries or exorbitant fees. You can participate in project discussions at /LighthouseProjects, and watch the progress of fundraisers at lightlist.io.

Bitcoin Projects

Here is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $500 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
If you want to use 'bits' exclusively, just remember that there are 100 satoshis in 1 bit, and 1 million bits in one bitcoin. For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? The friendly folks at /BitcoinBeginners would be happy to help you out, or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO MIXING BITCOINS AND MAKING THEM UNTRACEABLE

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY TUMBLING (MIXING) BITCOINS

📷
Bitcoin tumbling, also referred to as Bitcoin mixing or Bitcoin laundering, is the process of using a third party service to break the connection between a Bitcoin address sending coins and the address(s) they are sent to. Since the Bitcoin blockchain is a public ledger that records every transaction, mixing coins is critical for anyone who doesn’t want the entire world to know exactly where they send and store their BTC, or from where they receive it.
Properly mixing coins may seem like a daunting task to those who aren’t very familiar with Bitcoin, but it is actually a simple process that will only take a few minutes of your time for each deposit.
There are good reasons for everyone to mix their coins, but for those who use Darknet Markets in particular, it is a necessity. New tools are being built all the time to increase the ability of the public, as well as private corporations and government agencies, to follow coins through the blockchain and track those who use it. It may seem like a waste of time now, but in the near future it may be simple for anyone- including friends, relatives, employers, and law enforcement, to track every Bitcoin transaction you’ve ever made and see exactly where it ended up. Breaking the connection between your addresses and the coins’ destination by mixing them is certainly a precaution that all DNM users should take.
In this guide we attempt to provide the simplest possible step-by-step instructions to help users unfamiliar with the process of Bitcoin tumbling do so effectively. This guide assumes the reader already has a basic understand of how to send Bitcoins and how to use .onion sites.
To mix your coins using this method, you will need:
-Bitcoins, or the ability to buy them. -The Tor Browser -The ability to create new Bitcoin wallets, both via Tor and on the clear net. We recommended using Electrum, but any client that functions over Tor will work. Alternately, you could use Blockchain.info and their Tor hidden service to create all or some of your wallets.
NOTE: Always make sure you get the .onion link for this and every hidden service from a safe place (like Darknetmarkets.org), never from Wikipedia, Reddit, or Hidden Wikis! Also make sure that you never use the blockchain.info clearnet url over Tor; doing that opens you up another possible vulnerability (malicious tor exit nodes). A good place to make sure you are using the correct URL is from our Darknet Resources page, or memorize our short link for it: drk.li/BC.
The Steps
Step #1: Create a wallet on the clearnet. (We will refer to this as wallet #1)
Step #2: Buy Bitcoins, and send the amount you want to mix to wallet #1.
Step #3: Create a second wallet, this time over the Tor network. (wallet #2)
Step #4: Send your bitcoins from wallet #1 directly to wallet #2.
The reason for this is to add plausible dependability between your clearnet wallet and in-person purchases. If you are ever investigated by law enforcement or the company from which you are buying coins (this happens with Coinbase.com especially), you can reasonably claim that you sent them to someone else who controls wallet #2 (for whatever made-up reason you have in mind as your excuse for your BTC purchase). After that you have no idea/don’t care what that person did with them, nor should anyone expect you to.
Step #5: Create a third wallet, also over the Tor network. (wallet #3).
Step #6: Select which mixer you will be using, and set up your transaction there using the address(s) from wallet #3. It is best to use multiple addresses, and to set random time delays.
ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING THE CORRECT .ONION LINKS!
Scams are rampant everywhere online, and the darknet is no different. You can choose your mixer(s) and get the correct URLs from our list of darknet Bitcoin mixers.
We recommend Helix by Grams first, and then Bitcoin Fog, as the two seemingly best in a group of imperfect options. They have both been extremely reliable so far while processing millions of dollars. DO NOT use blockchain.info’s shared send or any other coinjoin product as your mixer, as those do not completely hide your trail like the others.
Mixers in DarkNet:
braveb6iya2flzc2.com - BraveBunny - Down
btcwashzcpqkxkwt.online - Bitcoin Wash Down
Bestbitcoincleaner.com - BestBitCoinCleaner ONLINE
btc-swap.com - Helix Light - ONLINE
Bitcoinfogg.com - BitcoinFogg DarkNet Mixer -ONLINE
NOTE: Turn off JavaScript before doing this step if you are using Helix, Bitcoin Fog, r or other mixers that function without it. (Click on the “S!” icon before the address bar in the Tor browser, then >Forbid Scripts Globally”.)
submitted by btcmixers to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

DEEPONION AND OTHER PRIVACY COINS

How Privacy Coins Work
Bitcoin transactions are semi-anonymous: every transaction on the blockchain is broadcast publicly and visible for all eternity, but the owner of each wallet is unknown. Tying addresses to real-world identities is now relatively easy for the powers-that-be, because everyone has to cash out somewhere, and that usually involves linking bitcoin addresses to bank accounts.
Privacy Tech Algorithms
The three most common privacy algorithms are zk-Snarks, Coinjoin, and RingCT. The latter method is used in monero; Coinjoin features in dash and is also being trialed with bitcoin; and zk-Snarks are used by most of the Z coins including Zcash.
Here’s how they work:
RingCT: Monero’s ring signatures allow the sender to hide their transaction among other outputs. In addition, RingCT makes it possible to hide the amount being sent. Coupled with a stealth receiving address, this makes for an extremely discreet way of sending funds. Transparency is optional with monero, which uses an “opaque” blockchain. Coinjoin: Developed by Gregory Maxwell, Coinjoin deploys a ‘safety in numbers’ approach. When two senders despatch a transaction of an identical amount, this is converted into a joint payment. When this occurs, correlating the transaction inputs and outputs is virtually impossible. There are many variants of Coinjoin including Private Send, which is used by dash, and Coin Shuffle; Cash Shuffle is the version currently being tested with bitcoin cash. zk-Snarks: Zero-Knowledge Succinct Non-Interactive Argument of Knowledge is a technology that allows miners to verify transactions without knowing who sent or received the coins. Using a cryptographic hash, each party can prove that a certain statement is true without revealing the precise details of who sent what and where. Although most commonly associated with the Zerocoin family, zk-Snarks are also being tested with ethereum.
The Main Privacy Players
Zcash: Born out of the Zerocoin protocol, Zcash is basically bitcoin with the option of privacy. There’s a fixed supply of 21 million coins and despite using a public blockchain, Zcash allows for the sender, recipient, and amount being sent all to be concealed. Researchers have published evidence that suggests some Zcash transactions can be de-anonymized, though for everyday usage, Zcash should still provide enough privacy for most people.
Monero: Like Zcash, monero has emerged as a viable cryptocurrency in its own right, even for individuals who aren’t interested in privacy. Its privacy tech is highly regarded and numerous deep web marketplaces accept monero. Monero usage surged in the wake of the Alphabay shutdown, after it emerged that feds were unable to determine how much XMR the site’s alleged kingpin, Alexandre Cazes, held.
Dash: By market cap, dash is the biggest coin on this list. It’s not an outright privacy coin however, but does have Private Send for users who’d prefer to keep their business to themselves. Transactions are confirmed by 200 TerraHash of X11 ASIC computing power and over 4,500 servers hosted around the world.
Zcoin: The other Z worth mentioning, Zcoin enables users to “mint” a coin on a public ledger so as to transform it into a private coin. This process can be repeated multiple times, allowing a coin to be sent publicly or privately as desired.
Pivx: An open source project, Pivx is another community-oriented privacy coin. It uses a mixing mechanism that’s based on Coinjoin, but which operates in a decentralized manner, aided by a network of masternodes. PIVX is the first proof of stake cryptocurrency to be based on the version 0.10 or higher Bitcoin codebase, and the PoS structure utilised does away with coin age, meaning in order to get the most out of your staking you must keep your wallet open at all times, resulting in more constantly available nodes, strengthening the network.
Verge: XVG is another anonymous cryptocurrency that was designed for privacy-friendly networks such as Tor and I2P. The general consensus is that verge isn’t as private as some of its competitors, so don’t trust it with your life. On the plus side, it boasts fast and low-cost transactions.
Spectrecoin Native Tor Integration preserves network privacy and protects users against surveillance, by keeping traffic within the Tor network at all times. OBFS4 Bridge Support facilitates undetected use in countries that block Tor, such as China & Iran. Spectrecoin is the only privacy coin to offer this feature
Deep Onion Deep Onion is a hybrid cryptocurrency that uses proof of stake (PoS) and the X13 proof of work (PoW) algorithm. It is natively integrated with the TOR network and ALL connections are made over the TOR network. Deep Onion is 90% premined, but 70% will be air-dropped to community, 20% will be used for bounties, rewards and other promotions, and about 10% will be reserved for the development team. The development team from Deep Onion focuses on creating a secure and anonymous transaction network as much possible. To achieve that they are utilizing the Tor network to connect up to. As a result your IP address is not registered anywhere when using Deep Onion. Instead of this an anonymous Tor network ID is created for you. What sets DeepOnion apart from other privacy Cryptos are its ability to adapt to market changes and constantly updating the platform. In this regard we have new features that will be realised soon in the form of DeepSend, these features will offer more anonymity and privacy operation over the TOR network which will make DeepOnion one of the most secure Private Crypto currencies in this age.
However, a particular Crypto currency provides an answer to the subject of Safety and Privacy. DeepOnion is an anonymous cryptocurrency which focuses on the privacy of its users. The DeepOnion developers utilize the Tor network to enable them to meet their key objective which is security. One of the qualities of this coin that makes it attractive to users is the fact that while using it, the user’s IP address is not registered on any platform. Instead of having your IP address registered, one gets an anonymous ID created for them in the Tor network. The Tor network offers multiple levels of privacy to ensure that your location, online activities, and identity are kept entirely confidential.
Tor is tightly integrated into the DeepOnion wallet, and it conceals a users identity and their online activity from any third parties by separating your identification and routing online traffic by the implementation of onion routing, which encrypts and then randomly bounces communications through a network of relays around the world.
Concealing your IP address is beneficial in that you can make transactions anonymously and no transaction can be traced back to you. Well, while some may fear that this is a loophole allowing for illegal transactions, it provides security for individuals making large transfers. Additionally, the coin boasts prompt transactions, with a faster speed than Bitcoin. The DeepOnion coin is still relatively young, yet it has managed to establish a very supportive community. Like bitcoin, DeepOnion runs on a peer-to-peer network, but its use of Tor network comes in as an added advantage. When using DeepOnion, one can be sure that their internet service provider or even the government is not monitoring them. It is freedom and privacy all in one package.
submitted by twinkledthomas to DeepOnion [link] [comments]

Some updates on joinmarket-clientserver

Hi, so here are a few things going on; also at the end some notes about using Joinmarket in today's environment:
I was prompted on this by user Onecoinbob, although there's a very valid discussion about whether wallets should have gone straight to bech32 addresses (instead of p2sh wrap), the reality is that some have (in particular, Electrum) and so I think it's pretty important that people can send coins there. Whether doing direct send (no coinjoin, -N 0), coinjoin, or in joinmarket-Qt you can now use bech32 addresses like "bc1qyzd2qj8tdrvyacvtknj2xav900qkr3a2xjrmg7" as valid destinations. Only master branch for now, will make a new release soon, it's a bit overdue.
Thanks to a couple of other users (including trotski2000), we have instructions how you can install manually in docs/INSTALL.md should there be some problem with the one-step installation. Feel free to ask on github issue or IRC or here (maybe ping me) for more help on this, but note I personally don't run a MacOS machine so I will redirect you.
I recently found that people don't know this exists, indeed I first created it nearly 2 years ago!.
See the PR ; this is backend stuff so little direct relevance to users; devs may be interested, it looks like a really good effort to rationalize and improve this section of the code.
I have started doing work on this, but it's not a small job, Joinmarket being very byte-manipulation heavy means there's quite a lot of changes to get it working on both 2 and 3. However it's really a good idea, a lot of useful libraries are migrating to/only supported on Py3. No real date or goal here.
I think most users already figured this out, but as a Taker the hit on fees from using Joinmarket is far too high in almost all cases (nothing to do with coinjoin fees; just Bitcoin network fees, which the Taker pays basically all of). It is possible in the model to share these fees, by certain sets of configuration, but the system hasn't really been set up like that.
Alternatively, the Taker may lowball a fee to a crazy extent and lock up the Maker coins for a long time.
I'd advise against using Joinmarket in periods of very high fees like we had last week; I'd even advise against Makers running their bots to prevent newbies suffering an unexpectedly high hit on fees. But of course everyone can make their own decision.
(EDIT: Forgot to add the really important thing, which is that whatever kind of transaction you're doing, including direct_send, seriously consider using the feature that setting tx_fees to any value above 144 results in using that figure as a custom fee in satoshis per kB, with a small randomization. So setting tx_fees = 300000 in the config means using a fee of 300 sat/b. Has been mentioned before but bears repeating!)
For myself, I have been actively looking at a number of alternative models (see some of my blog posts at https://joinmarket.me/blog/blog for example, my CoinswapCS repo, also "Snicker"), and of course other people are looking at things too e.g. the ZeroLink project of nopara.
Joinmarket as a model may also continue to be viable if the fee regime changes, and/or when new tech comes online that changes the economics (Schnorr in particular; CT itself would radically change the economics/viability of coinjoin but that is another discussion).
submitted by waxwing to joinmarket [link] [comments]

A call for anonymity in Bitcoin Wallets

This is a reminder that people should be using new addresses and coinjoin (or some similar anonymity schema) for each transaction.
I've been using GreenAddress.it for a while (BIP32 and 2-of-2 signing with a nlocktime backup transaction to recover my founds), but the Android app is far away from snappy. The usability is good, if you take away the fact that it's very slow, it's very easy to use and you don't have to deal with address generation. I love the idea and the concept behind it, but I feel it's still incomplete. I think it could benefit from a tool to improve anonymity, as many other wallets out there (most of them are way behind GreenAddress, with notable exceptions).
I've been talking about bitcoin with non-programmers, techie-friendly people and gave them some bits so they can play around. Many have purchased more bitcoins and I can know most of their balances because of address reuse.
Heck, I can generate back the tree of transactions done with my "address-reuse-avoiding wallet" using only a web-based blockchain explorer, given the fact that it's obvious that the addresses starting with "3" are mine and the ones starting with "1" are others'.
I think this is a big issue. I'm not talking about "people who have something to hide", it's everybody that is compromised. If bitcoin is to become more ubiquitous, this problem has to be solved from an usability point of view.
I'm eager to try coding a "anonymity check" tool to answer questions like these (even after avoiding address reuse, but before CoinJoin):
Some points where this tool can be smart are: differentiate between big outputs and small outputs (the former are most likely to be the change funds or savings account), address reincidence, extra data like first-known-of node that relayed the transaction, detect coinjoin transactions (they are easily identifiable) etc. I'd love to have my privacy checked by a tool like this, that should work offline. Blockchain.info's "taint analysis tool" is too dumb, online, and heavy to be useful.
For the paranoid ones: a three-letter-agency might already have one already.
submitted by eordano to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Idea: A Bitcoin mining pool that donates percentage of revenue to developing Bitcoin infrastructure

There are a lot of initiatives in the Bitcoin space which I feel need more funding, and if I am going to support them, I would rather do so by contributing a certain amount on a regular basis as part of a larger group of people, and have a dedicated team decide on worthy projects to fund, rather than trying to find individual projects myself and put up a bounty when I find one, and hope others will join me.
I see mining pools as the ideal place to pool resources for this type of collective effort. I was wondering if anything like a charitable pool existed, and if not, what others thought about the idea of creating one?
What I would like to see is a pool that takes 3 percent profit for themselves, donates 5 percent to Bitcoin-related projects, and leaves 93 percent for the miner.
Some initiatives I would like to see funded:
This one in particular pissed me off as I upvoted the original submission made in /bitcoin by the scammer, thinking it was a legitimate business:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1rre79/fucking_fuck_im_going_to_be_so_pissed_off_if_a/
Here's the scammer's submission:
http://www.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/1rpbpn/i_have_convinced_my_uncle_to_move_online_with_his/
I would pay to have a dedicated Bitcoin investigative team that goes after scammers.
Perhaps Darkwallet. Perhaps a version of Bitcoin-QT that uses CoinJoin by default.
There's only one full-time paid developer. It'd be nice if there was more funding of the core devs given so much rests on their work
__
That's all I can think of right now, but I'm certain there are many more areas where there are opportunities to fund projects that would really boost Bitcoin.
Thoughts?
submitted by aminok to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO SAFELY AND EFFECTIVELY TUMBLING (MIXING) BITCOINS

Bitcoin tumbling, also referred to as Bitcoin mixing or Bitcoin laundering, is the process of using a third party service to break the connection between a Bitcoin address sending coins and the address(s) they are sent to. Since the Bitcoin blockchain is a public ledger that records every transaction, mixing coins is critical for anyone who doesn’t want the entire world to know exactly where they send and store their BTC, or from where they receive it.
Properly mixing coins may seem like a daunting task to those who aren’t very familiar with Bitcoin, but it is actually a simple process that will only take a few minutes of your time for each deposit.
There are good reasons for everyone to mix their coins, but for those who use Darknet Markets in particular, it is a necessity. New tools are being built all the time to increase the ability of the public, as well as private corporations and government agencies, to follow coins through the blockchain and track those who use it. It may seem like a waste of time now, but in the near future it may be simple for anyone- including friends, relatives, employers, and law enforcement, to track every Bitcoin transaction you’ve ever made and see exactly where it ended up. Breaking the connection between your addresses and the coins’ destination by mixing them is certainly a precaution that all DNM users should take.
In this guide we attempt to provide the simplest possible step-by-step instructions to help users unfamiliar with the process of Bitcoin tumbling do so effectively. This guide assumes the reader already has a basic understand of how to send Bitcoins and how to use .onion sites.
To mix your coins using this method, you will need:
-Bitcoins, or the ability to buy them. -The Tor Browser -The ability to create new Bitcoin wallets, both via Tor and on the clear net. We recommended using Electrum, but any client that functions over Tor will work. Alternately, you could use Blockchain.info and their Tor hidden service to create all or some of your wallets.
NOTE: Always make sure you get the .onion link for this and every hidden service from a safe place (like Darknetmarkets.org), never from Wikipedia, Reddit, or Hidden Wikis! Also make sure that you never use the blockchain.info clearnet url over Tor; doing that opens you up another possible vulnerability (malicious tor exit nodes). A good place to make sure you are using the correct URL is from our Darknet Resources page, or memorize our short link for it: drk.li/BC.
The Steps
Step #1: Create a wallet on the clearnet. (We will refer to this as wallet #1)
Step #2: Buy Bitcoins, and send the amount you want to mix to wallet #1.
Step #3: Create a second wallet, this time over the Tor network. (wallet #2)
Step #4: Send your bitcoins from wallet #1 directly to wallet #2.
The reason for this is to add plausible dependability between your clearnet wallet and in-person purchases. If you are ever investigated by law enforcement or the company from which you are buying coins (this happens with Coinbase.com especially), you can reasonably claim that you sent them to someone else who controls wallet #2 (for whatever made-up reason you have in mind as your excuse for your BTC purchase). After that you have no idea/don’t care what that person did with them, nor should anyone expect you to.
Step #5: Create a third wallet, also over the Tor network. (wallet #3).
Step #6: Select which mixer you will be using, and set up your transaction there using the address(s) from wallet #3. It is best to use multiple addresses, and to set random time delays.
ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING THE CORRECT .ONION LINKS!
Scams are rampant everywhere online, and the darknet is no different. You can choose your mixer(s) and get the correct URLs from our list of darknet Bitcoin mixers.
We recommend Helix by Grams first, and then Bitcoin Fog, as the two seemingly best in a group of imperfect options. They have both been extremely reliable so far while processing millions of dollars. DO NOT use blockchain.info’s shared send or any other coinjoin product as your mixer, as those do not completely hide your trail like the others.
Mixers in DarkNet:
braveb6iyacflzc2.onion - BraveBunny
btcwashzcpqktkwt.onion - Bitcoin Wash
m2cylfgzmxwauyqz.onion - BTCmix
bitmixegkuerln7q.onion - bitmixer
cleancondgqja34b.onion - CleanCoin
cleanco.in - CleanCoin
foggeddq65qveh2g.onion - BitcoinFog
blenderi54mbtyhz.onion - BitcoinBlender
grams7eo7mkagczs.onion - Helix Light
laundryzlzgnni4n.onion - BitLaundry
NOTE: Turn off JavaScript before doing this step if you are using Helix, Bitcoin Fog, Bit Blender, or other mixers that function without it. (Click on the “S!” icon before the address bar in the Tor browser, then >Forbid Scripts Globally”.)
submitted by roninkash1972 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Bitcoin top posts from 2017-01-09 to 2017-02-08 00:18 PDT

Period: 29.84 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 46557
Rate (per day) 33.48 1507.53
Unique Redditors 653 6643
Combined Score 110856 177455

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3932 points, 2 submissions: tuqqs
    1. Clearly not mainstream yet (2808 points, 104 comments)
    2. what it'll look like, when it happens (1124 points, 195 comments)
  2. 3593 points, 19 submissions: helmsk
    1. Countdown: Bitcoin Will Be a Legal Method of Payment in Japan in Two Months (2316 points, 151 comments)
    2. Europe Lays Out Roadmap to Restrict Payments in Cash and Cryptocurrencies (317 points, 102 comments)
    3. Polish Bitcoin Adoption Escalating with Strong Ecosystem (86 points, 4 comments)
    4. Why South Korean Bitcoin Adoption Could Outpace Most Other Countries This Year (74 points, 3 comments)
    5. Pakistan Set to Become a Major Bitcoin Hub (72 points, 49 comments)
    6. UAE Did Not Ban Bitcoin (72 points, 2 comments)
    7. Europe Committed to Tightening Digital Currency Rules by End of 2017 (71 points, 23 comments)
    8. How to Start Your Own Bitcoin ATM Business (67 points, 15 comments)
    9. Coincheck's Growth Reveals Surging Japanese Bitcoin Trade (62 points, 8 comments)
    10. How Trump's Wall and Remittance Tax Could Give Bitcoin a Boost (60 points, 23 comments)
  3. 3177 points, 2 submissions: futureofeverything
    1. "R.I.P. Bitcoin. It's Time to Move On"....funny billboard driving around in Miami (3136 points, 227 comments)
    2. Why Venezuela's Currency Crisis Is A Case Study For Bitcoin (41 points, 1 comment)
  4. 2577 points, 7 submissions: Pizpie
    1. Welcome to Bitcoin, everyone. Don't worry, he'll recover. (1353 points, 155 comments)
    2. Breaking: Huobi & BTCC stopped margin trading, OKc leverage only 1x, finally no more fake BTC generated by exchange (485 points, 160 comments)
    3. Breaking: Bitcoin exchange Coinbase receives New York BitLicense (242 points, 55 comments)
    4. Canada Goose is thinking about accepting Bitcoin - Let them know what you think! (191 points, 49 comments)
    5. Confirmed: Huobi reactivates margin trading, with a limit of 100k CNY instead of 10 million CNY. (160 points, 79 comments)
    6. BREAKING: Huobi official announcement: We are considering charging trading fees. (80 points, 25 comments)
    7. Breaking: PBOC strikes again - Lending disabled on BTCC (66 points, 70 comments)
  5. 1941 points, 1 submission: bahatassafus
    1. Internet Archive: $3000 donated anonymously to the @internetarchive in bitcoin just now. Made our day! Thank you! (1941 points, 31 comments)
  6. 1338 points, 1 submission: kynek99
    1. Deutsche Bank - More than $10 billion in transactions never appeared on the books. That's why banksters don't want to use public blockchains. (1338 points, 96 comments)
  7. 1294 points, 1 submission: umbawumpa
    1. Julian Assange just used the current block hash as proof-of-not-prerecorded-interview in his AMA (1294 points, 182 comments)
  8. 1272 points, 2 submissions: Butt_Cheek_Spreader
    1. When you ride the bitcoin rally (1189 points, 204 comments)
    2. OKcoin and Huobi provided margin trading that violated rules resulting in abnormal price and fluctuations. (83 points, 28 comments)
  9. 1258 points, 4 submissions: dan_from_san_diego
    1. I started mining bitcoin in the desert. Here's some of what I have learned. (516 points, 575 comments)
    2. Chase is closing my account due to bitcoin purchases. Nice. (478 points, 410 comments)
    3. Here are some pictures of the solar greenhouse in the desert I am using to mine bitcoin. (140 points, 303 comments)
    4. Man... Brian Kelly from CNBC really fell hard for bitcoin. I like that! (124 points, 27 comments)
  10. 1250 points, 10 submissions: PoCaMiQu
    1. Can we fucking acknowledge that the Chinese Government just legitimized bitcoin? (604 points, 154 comments)
    2. WTF Huffington Post <---Fake News: "Bitcoin Plummets On Yuan Reversal" (218 points, 71 comments)
    3. This is what I like to see when checking daily's finances. (122 points, 22 comments)
    4. Beautiful balance (71 points, 13 comments)
    5. Reminder: Bitcoin's immutability is not only not a bug, but its main feature. Scalability comes secondary to it. (44 points, 20 comments)
    6. Bitcoin Price Gets Ready to Factor In Winklevoss Bitcoin ETF Approval (43 points, 24 comments)
    7. Paxful - a global leader in peer-to-peer bitcoin technology - has launched a new widget, allowing anyone to buy bitcoin worldwide instantly with over 300 ways to pay. (41 points, 34 comments)
    8. Scaling Revisited: What If Bitcoin's Big 'Problem' is Its Great Strength? (38 points, 16 comments)
    9. Flashback to the 90's: Interviewer asks Fed Chair "What is Blockchain?" (37 points, 21 comments)
    10. It seems all those FUD mongers were wrong when they predicted the price would crash without China's "liquidity" (32 points, 13 comments)
  11. 1155 points, 16 submissions: eragmus
    1. Ben Davenport (BitGo CTO): "Centralization of mining has led to some miners thinking they're in charge of Bitcoin. They forgot where Bitcoin's value comes from." (169 points, 112 comments)
    2. [Twitter Poll] Charlie Lee (Director of Engineering @ Coinbase): "What's the most important feature of Bitcoin that we must not sacrifice? Decentralization, Security, Low fees, Global payments" (116 points, 62 comments)
    3. Hernz: "Did you know you can get paid to help spread misinformation? -birds dot bitcoin dot com-" (hosted by Roger Ver) (106 points, 38 comments)
    4. The Passion of 'Bitcoin Jesus': How The Blockchain's Most Beloved Investor Became its Most Polarizing (101 points, 52 comments)
    5. Jonas Nick: "MimbleWimble blockchain (non-interactive coinjoin + pruning) may be able to support Lightning" / ref: Andrew Poelstra @ lists.launchpad.net/mimblewimble/msg00022.html (96 points, 19 comments)
    6. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (January 19, 2016) (83 points, 16 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (January 12, 2016) (68 points, 7 comments)
    8. WhalePanda: "Analyzed @rogerkver's 'Cry Wolf' tactic on censorship on /bitcoin." (59 points, 16 comments)
    9. Inside MAST: The Little-Known Plan to Advance Bitcoin Smart Contracts (52 points, 8 comments)
    10. Bitcoin Core - IRC Meeting Summary (January 5, 2016) (51 points, 2 comments)
  12. 1155 points, 14 submissions: castom
    1. Russian Authorities: Bitcoin Poses No Threat, Won’t Be Banned (575 points, 80 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Goes to Washington - Trump May Hire More Digital Currency Leaders (86 points, 50 comments)
    3. With Another $30 Million Investment, BitFury becomes the Highest-funded Bitcoin Company (80 points, 3 comments)
    4. Nigeria's Bitcoin Interest Unwavering Despite Government Crackdown (64 points, 3 comments)
    5. German TV Calls Bitcoin "Digital Gold" (46 points, 3 comments)
    6. A Town in Illinois Just Announced It's Holding a Bitcoin Sale (46 points, 9 comments)
    7. Coinbase CEO: IRS Battle Could Cost Startup $1 Million (43 points, 15 comments)
    8. Xapo Now Licensed to Operate from Switzerland (39 points, 2 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Payments Startup BitPesa Raises $2.5 Million (32 points, 0 comments)
    10. Lawsuit Accuses Bitcoin ATM Owner of Smashing Competing Machines With Hammers (31 points, 18 comments)
  13. 1140 points, 4 submissions: bdd4
    1. sigh (859 points, 189 comments)
    2. As Predicted. 🙄 PBoC (137 points, 86 comments)
    3. Friendly Reminder: Bitcoin is still up 2.6% for the last 30 days (94 points, 8 comments)
    4. Dead Man's Switch for HODLers (50 points, 84 comments)
  14. 1104 points, 3 submissions: Vaultoro
    1. "Great minds discuss ideas; average minds discuss events; small minds discuss people." can we please stop this culture of bashing or lifting cults of personality and get back to science? (807 points, 143 comments)
    2. The house of Nakamoto in the main shopping strip of Vienna gets massive new bitcoin logo signage 2 stories big, 4 times 4 meters of epic propaganda! (265 points, 32 comments)
    3. I saw a post here that little snitch takes bitcoin. I just purchased a copy! Great little app and well worth 30 bucks. (32 points, 9 comments)
  15. 1088 points, 3 submissions: Carlscrazyidea
    1. You can now buy Bitcoin from any 7-11 in the Philippines! (1021 points, 136 comments)
    2. What is my impact as a Bitcoin holder? (41 points, 45 comments)
    3. I am a Hodling noob who still has a lot of Hodling work to do! (26 points, 30 comments)
  16. 1060 points, 7 submissions: Bitcohen
    1. Mercedes Buys Bitcoin Service Provider in 'Digitization Strategy' (518 points, 70 comments)
    2. Mercedes-Benz cars are now being sold for Bitcoin in Venezuela (348 points, 68 comments)
    3. Dutch Pirate Party pays 11,250 Euro deposit in Bitcoin to Electoral Council (68 points, 9 comments)
    4. Amir Taaki & Cody Wilson's Bitcoin support described by film critic as “defense of criminality” at Sundance Film Festival 2017 (44 points, 13 comments)
    5. Russia's Kaliningrad May Trial 'Legal' Bitcoin, Launch Exchange (31 points, 2 comments)
    6. Bitcurex Owner 'Disappears' After Failing to Return 2,300 BTC (26 points, 2 comments)
    7. Liverpool Launches Own Digital Currency Based on Bitcoin's Blockchain Tech - Attracts 3,000 Users in First Month (25 points, 1 comment)
  17. 1009 points, 1 submission: worstkeptsecrets
    1. Bitcoin on NewEgg. 3rd option! Ahead of Credit Card and PayPal! #ITSHAPPENING (1009 points, 92 comments)
  18. 975 points, 1 submission: SooieSide
    1. You can't get to the moon on a roller coaster. (975 points, 73 comments)
  19. 941 points, 4 submissions: Logical007
    1. UPDATE: Nearly all of Circle's 5 Star Ratings have disappeared today for their latest version (Jan 5th). A stark difference to what we saw earlier, looks like action was taken. (633 points, 177 comments)
    2. Bloomberg: Wyre CEO: "Bitcoin is a good investment for everyone." (VIDEO (188 points, 13 comments)
    3. Bitcoin isn't 'real money'. Google, you need to work on your search results. (85 points, 38 comments)
    4. Coinbase, please fix your merchant invoices on iOS 10. They haven't worked properly for months (while BitPay's work perfectly). Details and screenshot inside. (35 points, 5 comments)
  20. 896 points, 1 submission: amendment64
    1. Just paid 23 cents on a $3.74 transaction. When does it end? $1.00 per transaction? $2? $5? I don't wanna stop using this peer to peer currency, but I'm fast being priced out of it. (896 points, 1017 comments)
  21. 884 points, 2 submissions: theswapman
    1. Bitcoiner interrupts Shia LaBeouf's "He Will Not Divide Us" stream with chant that Bitcoin Will Unite Us! (456 points, 204 comments)
    2. PSA: Xapo will freeze your bitcoin and demand documents AFTER you have deposited (428 points, 101 comments)
  22. 820 points, 3 submissions: MorrisMustang
    1. South Florida Distillers uses heat from bitcoin mining to accelerate rum barrel aging! (709 points, 66 comments)
    2. "See, bitcoin is down 9.75% over the past month...I told you it crashed..." says my wife (72 points, 64 comments)
    3. EthereRum by South Florida Distillers, the worlds first rum distilled from mining heat. Stayed tuned for more details. (39 points, 21 comments)
  23. 799 points, 5 submissions: finalhedge
    1. Patrick Byrne (Overstock CEO) on Fox Business Channel today (288 points, 57 comments)
    2. "Sent my first instant bitcoin LN payment to a random irc user on testnet. Second-layer tech for the win!" | Justin Camarena on Twitter (250 points, 64 comments)
    3. Balaji Srinivasan (21 CEO) just deleted his whole tweet history. Heading to the FDA? (137 points, 69 comments)
    4. BARRY SILBERT'S BITCOIN INVESTMENT TRUST FILES FOR IPO (99 points, 10 comments)
    5. Bloomberg: 'Blockchain' Fans Will Have A Rude Awakening In 2017 (25 points, 2 comments)
  24. 798 points, 9 submissions: FluxSeer
    1. Gemini Introduces Zero-Confirmation Bitcoin Deposits (205 points, 69 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Mining Distribution 2012 vs. 2017 (146 points, 69 comments)
    3. When someone says Bitcoin is a ponzi/scam/etc... Send them this link. (131 points, 24 comments)
    4. Developer Release for OpenBazaar 2.0 (123 points, 45 comments)
    5. Federal Reserve Staffer Fined for Mining Bitcoins at Work (62 points, 4 comments)
    6. A Future Led by Bitcoin Unlimited is a Centralized Future (56 points, 38 comments)
    7. Blockstream joins Digital Garage to jointly develop next-generation financial technology (33 points, 15 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Matrix Wallpaper (1920x1080) (23 points, 6 comments)
    9. The ECB Explains Why Central Banks Can't Go Bankrupt (19 points, 7 comments)
  25. 796 points, 1 submission: kidblondie
    1. [AMA] I'm the woman who got pepper sprayed wearing the "Make Bitcoin Great Again" hat. (796 points, 938 comments)
  26. 709 points, 1 submission: silver_89
    1. Liftoff (709 points, 282 comments)
  27. 697 points, 2 submissions: Tfoe1399
    1. Huge shoutout to BTC.com for giving me back my money (666 points, 91 comments)
    2. So this just happened (31 points, 101 comments)
  28. 691 points, 3 submissions: jholmes91
    1. Antonopoulos Supports SegWit, Opens Doors For Lightning and TumbleBit (315 points, 112 comments)
    2. Donald Trump is Considering a Bitcoin Entrepreneur to Lead the FDA (220 points, 137 comments)
    3. Japanese Internet Giant GMO Announces Entrance to Bitcoin Wallet Market (156 points, 14 comments)
  29. 688 points, 2 submissions: belcher_
    1. bitcoin.com loses 13.2BTC trying to fork the network: Untested and buggy BU creates an oversized block, Many BU node banned, the HF fails (543 points, 428 comments)
    2. Segwit talk by Pieter Wuille. 25 minutes talk time (145 points, 21 comments)
  30. 673 points, 9 submissions: Lite_Coin_Guy
    1. Litecoin Moves to Adopt Bitcoin's SegWit Scaling Upgrade (155 points, 86 comments)
    2. If Bitcoin ETF approval ignites speculative rush, doesn't that prove intense latent demand, blocked only by the SEC? (120 points, 22 comments)
    3. Big miners are free to create their Unlimited coin, but if they try to kill Bitcoin it will resist censorship and route around it. (108 points, 103 comments)
    4. What is money? (93 points, 56 comments)
    5. Charlie Shrems next jail time? (50 points, 15 comments)
    6. In 1996 they said the Internet was in need of a "killer app". In 2016, they said #Bitcoin needed a "killer app", too. (39 points, 17 comments)
    7. Introduction to Bitcoin & Blockchains (38 points, 5 comments)
    8. Evaporative Two-Phase Immersion Cooling (Bitfury) (37 points, 6 comments)
    9. Crypto '98 Rump Session- Hal Finney (33 points, 8 comments)
  31. 635 points, 8 submissions: olivercarding
    1. Bitcoin Has Many Fans at Amazon According to Purse CEO Andrew Lee (152 points, 39 comments)
    2. Bitcoin is Closing in On Its Transaction Capacity Limit, For Real This Time (110 points, 155 comments)
    3. The Founder of India-Based Bitcoin Mining Pool GBMiners is Running a Ponzi Scheme (105 points, 50 comments)
    4. How Bitcoin Is Disrupting The Online Gambling Industry (98 points, 74 comments)
    5. Report Estimates There are More Than 10 Million Bitcoin Holders Worldwide (91 points, 54 comments)
    6. Blockchain Announces Expansion in Middle East; Partners with Dubai Government (32 points, 7 comments)
    7. 3 Teams Receive Funding from $1.2 Million Bitcoin Development Grant, More Funds Incoming (27 points, 7 comments)
    8. Digital Garage and Blockstream Collaborate on New Blockchain Solutions for Japanese Market (20 points, 0 comments)
  32. 630 points, 1 submission: classna
    1. FOMO-ing right now (630 points, 85 comments)
  33. 621 points, 7 submissions: _smudger_
    1. Bitcoin: Why It Now Belongs in Every Portfolio (206 points, 33 comments)
    2. Bitcoin ETF may attract $300 million in the first week, says Needham & company (205 points, 103 comments)
    3. It's time to start thinking about denominating Bitcoins in mBTC permanently. Might be the last time to buy some for less than a dollar each! (82 points, 127 comments)
    4. Big China bitcoin exchange says no government pressure on outflows (46 points, 6 comments)
    5. New weekly record in Local Bitcoin volumes plus new highs in Canada, Colombia, Denmark, Saudi Arabia, Thailand and Venezuela (36 points, 1 comment)
    6. Despite the recent drop the price is hitting new records when averaged over a year (24 points, 10 comments)
    7. Press Release: CD Key retailer CJS CD Keys now Accepting Bitcoin (22 points, 3 comments)
  34. 597 points, 1 submission: arichnad
    1. mac has the new bitcoin Unicode character already! (597 points, 81 comments)
  35. 594 points, 1 submission: drvox1600
    1. Bitcoin just hit $1000 USD! :D (594 points, 147 comments)
  36. 573 points, 4 submissions: bitcoinglobe
    1. Japanese internet giant, GMO, entering bitcoin exchange and wallet markets (451 points, 26 comments)
    2. Abra overview (52 points, 22 comments)
    3. Japan Could See 20,000 Bitcoin Accepting Merchants in 2017 - CryptoCoinsNews (44 points, 5 comments)
    4. Bitcoin is gold with a teleporter (26 points, 2 comments)
  37. 567 points, 9 submissions: PrimeParticle
    1. "Introduction to Bitcoin" - Andreas Antonopoulos (Probably one of the best videos for introducing bitcoin). (131 points, 7 comments)
    2. Venezuela's currency now worth so little shopkeepers weigh vast piles of notes instead of counting them (118 points, 42 comments)
    3. Coins are cheaper in China by $30 to $50 dollars for the first time in a long time, that means... (92 points, 87 comments)
    4. Andreas Antonopoulos - The Death of Money | London Real (57 points, 1 comment)
    5. Abra: Bitcoin To Fiat Withdrawals At Tellers Globally! - 2017 North American Bitcoin Conference (47 points, 14 comments)
    6. Remember that you can use CPFP or RBF to get your transactions confirmed faster. (45 points, 46 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Q&A: The Lightning Network & Rootstock (30 points, 1 comment)
    8. Public Perception of Bitcoin is Slowly Shifting Amid Global Financial Turmoil (25 points, 1 comment)
    9. Bitcoin is shrugging off some big news of out of China (22 points, 1 comment)
  38. 561 points, 1 submission: kevsudos
    1. Bitcoin Hodlers Be Like........ (561 points, 96 comments)
  39. 543 points, 1 submission: turn-down-for-what
    1. $1,000! (543 points, 49 comments)
  40. 539 points, 1 submission: BlahYourHamster
    1. [META] Can we use the Bitcoin Rollercoster Guy as the upvote and downvote arrows? (539 points, 49 comments)
  41. 538 points, 7 submissions: themetalfriend
    1. The real superhero (210 points, 15 comments)
    2. Countries where you can survive on Bitcoin (map) (76 points, 88 comments)
    3. How practical is it to live on Bitcoin: historical progress (gif) (63 points, 40 comments)
    4. Among the countries with the strongest Bitcoin adoption: Slovenia, Finland, Singapore, Hong Kong, Canada, Switzerland (63 points, 13 comments)
    5. Long-term bitcoiner checking this sub (51 points, 9 comments)
    6. The complete list of the factors that influence the value of Bitcoin (45 points, 29 comments)
    7. Will Bitcoin work on Mars? (30 points, 41 comments)
  42. 521 points, 2 submissions: roasbeef
    1. Announcing the Alpha Release of the Lightning Network Daemon! (427 points, 152 comments)
    2. Setting up and Testing LND with the Testnet Lightning Faucet (94 points, 7 comments)
  43. 506 points, 1 submission: ToTheMoonGuy
    1. Super Bowl Bitcoin Lady (506 points, 37 comments)
  44. 484 points, 1 submission: ssienk117
    1. My new Phone background. Thanks u/SooieSide/ (484 points, 30 comments)
  45. 472 points, 2 submissions: Wingsuit
    1. I think duck duck go should improve their decimal accuracy (386 points, 41 comments)
    2. Bitcoin achieves leetness in Australia (86 points, 12 comments)
  46. 470 points, 1 submission: robertgenito
    1. The REAL good ol' days of bitcoin... (470 points, 103 comments)
  47. 444 points, 1 submission: loserkids
    1. Bitcoin saved my ass in South East Asia (444 points, 115 comments)
  48. 441 points, 1 submission: boyber
    1. LibreTaxi, free and open source UbeLyft alternative to connect passengers and drivers - bitcoin integration on the way! (441 points, 94 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. nullc (2659 points, 215 comments)
  2. kidblondie (2127 points, 89 comments)
  3. BashCo (1530 points, 293 comments)
  4. dellintelbitcoin (1400 points, 372 comments)
  5. smartfbrankings (1141 points, 265 comments)
  6. belcher_ (1031 points, 149 comments)
  7. Frogolocalypse (986 points, 322 comments)
  8. dan_from_san_diego (949 points, 554 comments)
  9. Cryptolution (851 points, 226 comments)
  10. Vaultoro (822 points, 100 comments)
  11. thieflar (792 points, 231 comments)
  12. Lite_Coin_Guy (748 points, 219 comments)
  13. Cryptoconomy (728 points, 134 comments)
  14. Coinosphere (723 points, 282 comments)
  15. luke-jr (718 points, 141 comments)
  16. waxwing (707 points, 117 comments)
  17. bitsteiner (658 points, 157 comments)
  18. BitttBurger (646 points, 157 comments)
  19. shesek1 (607 points, 132 comments)
  20. pb1x (595 points, 76 comments)
  21. jratcliff63367 (591 points, 45 comments)
  22. supermari0 (587 points, 131 comments)
  23. bitusher (581 points, 96 comments)
  24. 4n4n4 (576 points, 79 comments)
  25. coinjaf (562 points, 225 comments)
  26. glockbtc (541 points, 168 comments)
  27. 45sbvad (539 points, 102 comments)
  28. killerstorm (536 points, 119 comments)
  29. adam3us (527 points, 66 comments)
  30. maaku7 (527 points, 63 comments)
  31. nopara73 (523 points, 120 comments)
  32. phor2zero (499 points, 66 comments)
  33. PrimeParticle (496 points, 108 comments)
  34. sreaka (495 points, 155 comments)
  35. jonny1000 (488 points, 98 comments)
  36. CoinCadence (487 points, 77 comments)
  37. SatoshisCat (480 points, 150 comments)
  38. petertodd (473 points, 24 comments)
  39. spoonfednonsense (472 points, 126 comments)
  40. Hitchslappy (472 points, 102 comments)
  41. albuminvasion (466 points, 84 comments)
  42. Taek42 (456 points, 44 comments)
  43. chrisrico (452 points, 87 comments)
  44. AnonymousRev (451 points, 115 comments)
  45. the_bob (443 points, 114 comments)
  46. satoshicoin (438 points, 65 comments)
  47. Riiume (434 points, 83 comments)
  48. exab (430 points, 125 comments)
  49. jimmajamma (422 points, 141 comments)
  50. brg444 (421 points, 69 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. "R.I.P. Bitcoin. It's Time to Move On"....funny billboard driving around in Miami by futureofeverything (3136 points, 227 comments)
  2. Clearly not mainstream yet by tuqqs (2808 points, 104 comments)
  3. Countdown: Bitcoin Will Be a Legal Method of Payment in Japan in Two Months by helmsk (2316 points, 151 comments)
  4. Internet Archive: $3000 donated anonymously to the @internetarchive in bitcoin just now. Made our day! Thank you! by bahatassafus (1941 points, 31 comments)
  5. Welcome to Bitcoin, everyone. Don't worry, he'll recover. by Pizpie (1353 points, 155 comments)
  6. Deutsche Bank - More than $10 billion in transactions never appeared on the books. That's why banksters don't want to use public blockchains. by kynek99 (1338 points, 96 comments)
  7. Julian Assange just used the current block hash as proof-of-not-prerecorded-interview in his AMA by umbawumpa (1294 points, 182 comments)
  8. When you ride the bitcoin rally by Butt_Cheek_Spreader (1189 points, 204 comments)
  9. what it'll look like, when it happens by tuqqs (1124 points, 195 comments)
  10. You can now buy Bitcoin from any 7-11 in the Philippines! by Carlscrazyidea (1021 points, 136 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 380 points: Tyatku's comment in When you ride the bitcoin rally
  2. 340 points: Vaultoro's comment in Just paid 23 cents on a $3.74 transaction. When does it end? $1.00 per transaction? $2? $5? I don't wanna stop using this peer to peer currency, but I'm fast being priced out of it.
  3. 323 points: jamesdpitley's comment in "R.I.P. Bitcoin. It's Time to Move On"....funny billboard driving around in Miami
  4. 290 points: Clutch70's comment in Clearly not mainstream yet
  5. 212 points: BitcoinDreamland's comment in South Florida Distillers uses heat from bitcoin mining to accelerate rum barrel aging!
  6. 206 points: bitpotluck's comment in FOMO-ing right now
  7. 195 points: howardkinsd's comment in Clearly not mainstream yet
  8. 182 points: beloboi's comment in "R.I.P. Bitcoin. It's Time to Move On"....funny billboard driving around in Miami
  9. 181 points: BattleChimp's comment in "R.I.P. Bitcoin. It's Time to Move On"....funny billboard driving around in Miami
  10. 179 points: kidblondie's comment in [AMA] I'm the woman who got pepper sprayed wearing the "Make Bitcoin Great Again" hat.
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats (Donate)
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

BitcoinOfficial.org - How to create a Bitcoin Wallet online? (Instructions) How to anonymize your Bitcoin with Wasabi wallet Consolidating CoinJoin Wasabi wallet - 6 Coinjoining BITCOIN PRIVACY TRANSACTIONS : COINJOIN & BITCOIN MIXERS IN HINDI

The past two days, my BTC was listed as unconfirmed following a CoinJoin and transfer to second wallet. Followed a recommendation about an hour ago to remove Transactions.dat in BitcoinStore > Main > Mempool and then reboot Wasabi. Wasabi Wallet, formerly known as HiddenWallet is a ZeroLink compliant Bitcoin wallet. We are dedicated to Build your own Lightning Node on a RaspberryPi with a nice Display. Version 1.5.1 with lnd 0.9.2-beta (0.10.0-beta optional) and bitcoin 0.19.1 (or litecoin 0.17.1) The RaspiBlitz is a do-it-yourself Lightning Node based on LND running together with a Bitcoin-Fullnode on a RaspberryPi 3/4 - with a Although Satoshi Nakamoto’s white paper suggests that privacy was a design goal of the Bitcoin protocol, blockchain analysis can often break users’ privacy. This is a problem. Bitcoin users might not necessarily want the world to know where they spend their money, what they earn or how much they own Coinbase is a secure platform that makes it easy to buy, sell, and store cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more. Based in the USA, Coinbase is available in over 30 countries worldwide. Step 1. Set up a wallet. Before you can purchase Bitcoin, ensure that you have set up a wallet in order to store, receive and send bitcoin. Here are some bitcoin wallets to get you started. Step 2. Purchase bitcoin. It is now time to join the cryptocurrency world and purchase your first Bitcoin.

[index] [27618] [12745] [10361] [29458] [1162] [2523] [17392] [1258] [8618] [11677]

BitcoinOfficial.org - How to create a Bitcoin Wallet online? (Instructions)

Demo of the bch-cli-wallet and Consolidating CoinJoin server. Two open source projects using an MIT license to help the Bitcoin Cash community improve fungability and privacy on the BCH network. Wasabi is an open-source, non-custodial, privacy focused Bitcoin wallet, that implements trustless coin shuffling with mathematically provable anonymity: Chaumian CoinJoin, it is the first of its ... The main advantages of BitcoinOfficial.org are: quick wallet creation, simple interface, access to private keys, the ability to buy and sell Bitcoin at the best rate right through the wallet website. https://coincrunch.in/2020/04/13/making-bitcoin-anonymous-again-with-coinjoin-using-samurai-wallet-and-whirlpool/ https://www.mycryptomixer.com/prepare » BRA... Wasabi is an open-source, non-custodial, privacy focused Bitcoin wallet, that implements trust-less coin shuffling with mathematically provable anonymity: Chaumian CoinJoin, it is the first of its ...

Flag Counter