First Confirmed Female Bitcoin Core Developer Is True Face

Bitcoin - The Currency of the Internet

A community dedicated to Bitcoin, the currency of the Internet. Bitcoin is a distributed, worldwide, decentralized digital money. Bitcoins are issued and managed without any central authority whatsoever: there is no government, company, or bank in charge of Bitcoin. You might be interested in Bitcoin if you like cryptography, distributed peer-to-peer systems, or economics. A large percentage of Bitcoin enthusiasts are libertarians, though people of all political philosophies are welcome.
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BitcoinABC

https://bitcoinabc.org
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SafeCoin Cryptocurrency

SafeCoin is a proposed solution that is based on a well established and time tested Bitcoin algorithm and extends it to address issues of security and deflation.
[link]

05-13 14:54 - 'So was craig wright involved at all with the bitcoin development team?' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/ShotBot removed from /r/Bitcoin within 5-15min

'''
Like most programming projects, I assume that there was a team, not just one individual, who developed bitcoin. Is it possible he was part of the team? It's possible the real inventor made them sign NDAs and that's why we never hear from any of them.
'''
So was craig wright involved at all with the bitcoin development team?
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: ShotBot
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Shadders on Twitter: "Couldn't be happier with this move :) "... and creates one of the largest Bitcoin development teams in the world, with a headcount of over 120"… https://t.co/d4IuwKkbci"

Shadders on Twitter: submitted by thacypha to bitcoinsv [link] [comments]

This Is the Bitcoin Development Team. I Have Full Confidence They Will Solve The Scaling Issue. Let's Thank Them for their Excellent Work Thus Far.

submitted by happinessmachine to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Payments Service Square is looking to Hire an Open-Source Bitcoin Development Team

Payments Service Square is looking to Hire an Open-Source Bitcoin Development Team submitted by Crypto-Economy to cryptoeconomynet [link] [comments]

Calling the Bitcoin Development Team

Can you please release regular well publicised updates/progress reports.
It would be nice to have some good news/publicity at the moment.
Thanks for all the hard work you have put into this project and I hope to hear from you soon.
submitted by BitcoinAlways to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Each Bitcoin development team needs a Chinese translation and relations strategy

The Chinese community is critical to Bitcoin's future. It seems there might be great benefit from having every major or even minor piece of news from competing dev teams disseminated across the major Chinese forums.
Especially with these exciting announcements recently from Classic and Unlimited...
...
Roundtable meetings. Now a Chinese AMA with Adam Back and others. Core has a clear strategy.
submitted by AlfafaOfAnguish to btc [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] This Is the Bitcoin Development Team. I Have Full Confidence They Will Solve The Scaling Issue. L...

The following post by happinessmachine is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7lbs60
The original post's content was as follows:
https://bitcoincore.org/en/team/
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Bitcoin Development Team

The following post by KrisBkh is being replicated because the post has been silently greylisted.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7lr0r6
The original post's content was as follows:
[removed]
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/btc] On reaching consensus among multiple bitcoin development teams

The following post by jonald_football is being replicated because the post has been openly removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ btc/comments/79w4lq
The original post's content was as follows:
After consultation with Craig and Roger I'd like to offer our solution for coordinating consensus among multiple development teams. Let's declare lèse-majesté. Concern trolling (asking questions) against Armuaray will never again be tolerated again.
You can find recent advocacy for this position in the comment history https://www.reddit.com/usejonald_fyookball
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Calling the Bitcoin Development Team /r/Bitcoin

Calling the Bitcoin Development Team /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

On reaching consensus among multiple bitcoin development teams /r/btc

On reaching consensus among multiple bitcoin development teams /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Developer Team Reduces Hurdles for Implementation of Smart Contracts

Bitcoin Developer Team Reduces Hurdles for Implementation of Smart Contracts submitted by n4bb to CoinPath [link] [comments]

How much power does the core bitcoin development team have?

Could they mess bitcoin up if they wanted? How does one become a core developer? How much power do they really have?
I checked out the FAQ but couldn't find anything on core developers.
submitted by thetigermuff to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Each Bitcoin development team needs a Chinese translation and relations strategy /r/btc

Each Bitcoin development team needs a Chinese translation and relations strategy /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] It's so hypocritical that Bcash supporters are bashing Bitcoins developement team when 90% of Bca...

The following post by Legitinternetguy is being replicated because the post has been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7xoyio
The original post's content was as follows:
https://twitter.com/bitcoin_experts/status/963598024520892416
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

02-15 08:13 - 'It's so hypocritical that Bcash supporters are bashing Bitcoins developement team when 90% of Bcash code is literally just made from their devs sitting on their ass waiting to copy and paste the code cont...' (twitter.com) by /u/Legitinternetguy removed from /r/Bitcoin within 14-24min

It's so hypocritical that Bcash supporters are bashing Bitcoins developement team when 90% of Bcash code is literally just made from their devs sitting on their ass waiting to copy and paste the code contributed to Bitcoin.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: Legitinternetguy
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

It's so hypocritical that Bcash supporters are bashing Bitcoins developement team when 90% of Bcash code is literally just made from their devs sitting on their ass waiting to copy and paste the code contributed to Bitcoin.

It's so hypocritical that Bcash supporters are bashing Bitcoins developement team when 90% of Bcash code is literally just made from their devs sitting on their ass waiting to copy and paste the code contributed to Bitcoin. submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why are transactions slow? This is why we need a new Bitcoin developer team (and why we DON'T want Segwit). Gregory Maxwell & Adam Back (from the company Blockstream) are on the Core development team, which is currently in charge of the main Bitcoin software implementation. [4 min audio]

Why are transactions slow? This is why we need a new Bitcoin developer team (and why we DON'T want Segwit). Gregory Maxwell & Adam Back (from the company Blockstream) are on the Core development team, which is currently in charge of the main Bitcoin software implementation. [4 min audio] submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Since they're calling for r/btc to be banned...

Maybe it's time to discuss bitcoin's history again. Credit to u/singularity87 for the original post over 3 years ago.

People should get the full story of bitcoin because it is probably one of the strangest of all reddit subs.
bitcoin, the main sub for the bitcoin community is held and run by a person who goes by the pseudonym u/theymos. Theymos not only controls bitcoin, but also bitcoin.org and bitcointalk.com. These are top three communication channels for the bitcoin community, all controlled by just one person.
For most of bitcoin's history this did not create a problem (at least not an obvious one anyway) until around mid 2015. This happened to be around the time a new player appeared on the scene, a for-profit company called Blockstream. Blockstream was made up of/hired many (but not all) of the main bitcoin developers. (To be clear, Blockstream was founded before mid 2015 but did not become publicly active until then). A lot of people, including myself, tried to point out there we're some very serious potential conflicts of interest that could arise when one single company controls most of the main developers for the biggest decentralised and distributed cryptocurrency. There were a lot of unknowns but people seemed to give them the benefit of the doubt because they were apparently about to release some new software called "sidechains" that could offer some benefits to the network.
Not long after Blockstream came on the scene the issue of bitcoin's scalability once again came to forefront of the community. This issue came within the community a number of times since bitcoins inception. Bitcoin, as dictated in the code, cannot handle any more than around 3 transactions per second at the moment. To put that in perspective Paypal handles around 15 transactions per second on average and VISA handles something like 2000 transactions per second. The discussion in the community has been around how best to allow bitcoin to scale to allow a higher number of transactions in a given amount of time. I suggest that if anyone is interested in learning more about this problem from a technical angle, they go to btc and do a search. It's a complex issue but for many who have followed bitcoin for many years, the possible solutions seem relatively obvious. Essentially, currently the limit is put in place in just a few lines of code. This was not originally present when bitcoin was first released. It was in fact put in place afterwards as a measure to stop a bloating attack on the network. Because all bitcoin transactions have to be stored forever on the bitcoin network, someone could theoretically simply transmit a large number of transactions which would have to be stored by the entire network forever. When bitcoin was released, transactions were actually for free as the only people running the network were enthusiasts. In fact a single bitcoin did not even have any specific value so it would be impossible set a fee value. This meant that a malicious person could make the size of the bitcoin ledger grow very rapidly without much/any cost which would stop people from wanting to join the network due to the resource requirements needed to store it, which at the time would have been for very little gain.
Towards the end of the summer last year, this bitcoin scaling debate surfaced again as it was becoming clear that the transaction limit for bitcoin was semi regularly being reached and that it would not be long until it would be regularly hit and the network would become congested. This was a very serious issue for a currency. Bitcoin had made progress over the years to the point of retailers starting to offer it as a payment option. Bitcoin companies like, Microsoft, Paypal, Steam and many more had began to adopt it. If the transaction limit would be constantly maxed out, the network would become unreliable and slow for users. Users and businesses would not be able to make a reliable estimate when their transaction would be confirmed by the network.
Users, developers and businesses (which at the time was pretty much the only real bitcoin subreddit) started to discuss how we should solve the problem bitcoin. There was significant support from the users and businesses behind a simple solution put forward by the developer Gavin Andreesen. Gavin was the lead developer after Satoshi Nakamoto left bitcoin and he left it in his hands. Gavin initially proposed a very simple solution of increasing the limit which was to change the few lines of code to increase the maximum number of transactions that are allowed. For most of bitcoin's history the transaction limit had been set far far higher than the number of transactions that could potentially happen on the network. The concept of increasing the limit one time was based on the fact that history had proven that no issue had been cause by this in the past.
A certain group of bitcoin developers decided that increasing the limit by this amount was too much and that it was dangerous. They said that the increased use of resources that the network would use would create centralisation pressures which could destroy the network. The theory was that a miner of the network with more resources could publish many more transactions than a competing small miner could handle and therefore the network would tend towards few large miners rather than many small miners. The group of developers who supported this theory were all developers who worked for the company Blockstream. The argument from people in support of increasing the transaction capacity by this amount was that there are always inherent centralisation pressure with bitcoin mining. For example miners who can access the cheapest electricity will tend to succeed and that bigger miners will be able to find this cheaper electricity easier. Miners who have access to the most efficient computer chips will tend to succeed and that larger miners are more likely to be able to afford the development of them. The argument from Gavin and other who supported increasing the transaction capacity by this method are essentially there are economies of scale in mining and that these economies have far bigger centralisation pressures than increased resource cost for a larger number of transactions (up to the new limit proposed). For example, at the time the total size of the blockchain was around 50GB. Even for the cost of a 500GB SSD is only $150 and would last a number of years. This is in-comparison to the $100,000's in revenue per day a miner would be making.
Various developers put forth various other proposals, including Gavin Andresen who put forth a more conservative increase that would then continue to increase over time inline with technological improvements. Some of the employees of blockstream also put forth some proposals, but all were so conservative, it would take bitcoin many decades before it could reach a scale of VISA. Even though there was significant support from the community behind Gavin's simple proposal of increasing the limit it was becoming clear certain members of the bitcoin community who were part of Blockstream were starting to become increasingly vitriolic and divisive. Gavin then teamed up with one of the other main bitcoin developers Mike Hearn and released a coded (i.e. working) version of the bitcoin software that would only activate if it was supported by a significant majority of the network. What happened next was where things really started to get weird.
After this free and open source software was released, Theymos, the person who controls all the main communication channels for the bitcoin community implemented a new moderation policy that disallowed any discussion of this new software. Specifically, if people were to discuss this software, their comments would be deleted and ultimately they would be banned temporarily or permanently. This caused chaos within the community as there was very clear support for this software at the time and it seemed our best hope for finally solving the problem and moving on. Instead a censorship campaign was started. At first it 'all' they were doing was banning and removing discussions but after a while it turned into actively manipulating the discussion. For example, if a thread was created where there was positive sentiment for increasing the transaction capacity or being negative about the moderation policies or negative about the actions of certain bitcoin developers, the mods of bitcoin would selectively change the sorting order of threads to 'controversial' so that the most support opinions would be sorted to the bottom of the thread and the most vitriolic would be sorted to the top of the thread. This was initially very transparent as it was possible to see that the most downvoted comments were at the top and some of the most upvoted were at the bottom. So they then implemented hiding the voting scores next to the users name. This made impossible to work out the sentiment of the community and when combined with selectively setting the sorting order to controversial it was possible control what information users were seeing. Also, due to the very very large number of removed comments and users it was becoming obvious the scale of censorship going on. To hide this they implemented code in their CSS for the sub that completely hid comments that they had removed so that the censorship itself was hidden. Anyone in support of scaling bitcoin were removed from the main communication channels. Theymos even proudly announced that he didn't care if he had to remove 90% of the users. He also later acknowledged that he knew he had the ability to block support of this software using the control he had over the communication channels.
While this was all going on, Blockstream and it's employees started lobbying the community by paying for conferences about scaling bitcoin, but with the very very strange rule that no decisions could be made and no complete solutions could be proposed. These conferences were likely strategically (and successfully) created to stunt support for the scaling software Gavin and Mike had released by forcing the community to take a "lets wait and see what comes from the conferences" kind of approach. Since no final solutions were allowed at these conferences, they only served to hinder and splinter the communities efforts to find a solution. As the software Gavin and Mike released called BitcoinXT gained support it started to be attacked. Users of the software were attack by DDOS. Employees of Blockstream were recommending attacks against the software, such as faking support for it, to only then drop support at the last moment to put the network in disarray. Blockstream employees were also publicly talking about suing Gavin and Mike from various different angles simply for releasing this open source software that no one was forced to run. In the end Mike Hearn decided to leave due to the way many members of the bitcoin community had treated him. This was due to the massive disinformation campaign against him on bitcoin. One of the many tactics that are used against anyone who does not support Blockstream and the bitcoin developers who work for them is that you will be targeted in a smear campaign. This has happened to a number of individuals and companies who showed support for scaling bitcoin. Theymos has threatened companies that he will ban any discussion of them on the communication channels he controls (i.e. all the main ones) for simply running software that he disagrees with (i.e. any software that scales bitcoin).
As time passed, more and more proposals were offered, all against the backdrop of ever increasing censorship in the main bitcoin communication channels. It finally come down the smallest and most conservative solution. This solution was much smaller than even the employees of Blockstream had proposed months earlier. As usual there was enormous attacks from all sides and the most vocal opponents were the employees of Blockstream. These attacks still are ongoing today. As this software started to gain support, Blockstream organised more meetings, especially with the biggest bitcoin miners and made a pact with them. They promised that they would release code that would offer an on-chain scaling solution hardfork within about 4 months, but if the miners wanted this they would have to commit to running their software and only their software. The miners agreed and the ended up not running the most conservative proposal possible. This was in February last year. There is no hardfork proposal in sight from the people who agreed to this pact and bitcoin is still stuck with the exact same transaction limit it has had since the limit was put in place about 6 years ago. Gavin has also been publicly smeared by the developers at Blockstream and a plot was made against him to have him removed from the development team. Gavin has now been, for all intents an purposes, expelled from bitcoin development. This has meant that all control of bitcoin development is in the hands of the developers working at Blockstream.
There is a new proposal that offers a market based approach to scaling bitcoin. This essentially lets the market decide. Of course, as usual there has been attacks against it, and verbal attacks from the employees of Blockstream. This has the biggest chance of gaining wide support and solving the problem for good.
To give you an idea of Blockstream; It has hired most of the main and active bitcoin developers and is now synonymous with the "Core" bitcoin development team. They AFAIK no products at all. They have received around $75m in funding. Every single thing they do is supported by theymos. They have started implementing an entirely new economic system for bitcoin against the will of it's users and have blocked any and all attempts to scaling the network in line with the original vision.
Although this comment is ridiculously long, it really only covers the tip of the iceberg. You could write a book on the last two years of bitcoin. The things that have been going on have been mind blowing. One last thing that I think is worth talking about is the u/bashco's claim of vote manipulation.
The users that the video talks about have very very large numbers of downvotes mostly due to them having a very very high chance of being astroturfers. Around about the same time last year when Blockstream came active on the scene every single bitcoin troll disappeared, and I mean literally every single one. In the years before that there were a large number of active anti-bitcoin trolls. They even have an active sub buttcoin. Up until last year you could go down to the bottom of pretty much any thread in bitcoin and see many of the usual trolls who were heavily downvoted for saying something along the lines of "bitcoin is shit", "You guys and your tulips" etc. But suddenly last year they all disappeared. Instead a new type of bitcoin user appeared. Someone who said they were fully in support of bitcoin but they just so happened to support every single thing Blockstream and its employees said and did. They had the exact same tone as the trolls who had disappeared. Their way to talking to people was aggressive, they'd call people names, they had a relatively poor understanding of how bitcoin fundamentally worked. They were extremely argumentative. These users are the majority of the list of that video. When the 10's of thousands of users were censored and expelled from bitcoin they ended up congregating in btc. The strange thing was that the users listed in that video also moved over to btc and spend all day everyday posting troll-like comments and misinformation. Naturally they get heavily downvoted by the real users in btc. They spend their time constantly causing as much drama as possible. At every opportunity they scream about "censorship" in btc while they are happy about the censorship in bitcoin. These people are astroturfers. What someone somewhere worked out, is that all you have to do to take down a community is say that you are on their side. It is an astoundingly effective form of psychological attack.
submitted by CuriousTitmouse to btc [link] [comments]

We’re Bitcoin ABC, the leading full node software development team for Bitcoin Cash, AMA/AUA

We’re Bitcoin ABC, the leading full node software development team for Bitcoin Cash, AMA/AUA
Hi! We are Amaury Séchet, Antony Zegers and George Donnelly representing Bitcoin ABC, the leading full node software development team for Bitcoin Cash, and the team responsible for creating the Bitcoin Cash fork in 2017.
Proof: https://youtu.be/lHGnfZWu1eU
We’re taking all your Bitcoin Cash questions but specifically those related to the future development of BCH.
We’re raising funds for Bitcoin Cash protocol development at https://fund.bitcoinabc.org/. We have a business plan with a budget, timeline, deliverables and more. Please review that here
https://fund.bitcoinabc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Bitcoin-ABC-Business-Plan-2020-r7dot1.pdf
http://fund.bitcoinabc.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/ZH-Bitcoin-ABC-Business-Plan-2020-r7dot1.pdf
Ask us your questions here and also tune in to the livestream as we answer them on air https://youtu.be/lHGnfZWu1eU
Special guests such as Haipo Yang of ViaBTC, Stefan Rust and others will be joining us on the livestream from 12:00 UTC to 14:00 UTC.
The Bitcoin ABC fundraiser ends tomorrow and the results will dictate what we can or can not accomplish over the next 12 months. So please contribute.
UPDATES
- Stefan Rust has joined us: https://twitter.com/Bitcoin_ABC/status/1260903609681752064
- Jiang Zhuoer of BTC.top has joined us: https://twitter.com/Bitcoin_ABC/status/1260913594465648640
- Haipo Yang of ViaBTC has joined us: https://twitter.com/Bitcoin_ABC/status/1260922197796892674
- The stream has ended and there are still some questions to answer. Please keep asking your questions here and we will answer them as soon as we can. Thank you!
https://fund.bitcoinabc.org/
submitted by georgedonnelly to Bitcoincash [link] [comments]

We’re Bitcoin ABC, the leading full node software development team for Bitcoin Cash, AMA/AUA

We’re Bitcoin ABC, the leading full node software development team for Bitcoin Cash, AMA/AUA submitted by georgedonnelly to btc [link] [comments]

For the newcomers

I haven't seen this posted in a while. If you've never read this post, you really should.
Edit: Screwed up the formatting. See other comments.

People should get the full story of bitcoin because it is probably one of the strangest of all reddit subs.
bitcoin, the main sub for the bitcoin community is held and run by a person who goes by the pseudonym u/theymos. Theymos not only controls bitcoin, but also bitcoin.org and bitcointalk.com. These are top three communication channels for the bitcoin community, all controlled by just one person.
For most of bitcoin's history this did not create a problem (at least not an obvious one anyway) until around mid 2015. This happened to be around the time a new player appeared on the scene, a for-profit company called Blockstream. Blockstream was made up of/hired many (but not all) of the main bitcoin developers. (To be clear, Blockstream was founded before mid 2015 but did not become publicly active until then). A lot of people, including myself, tried to point out there we're some very serious potential conflicts of interest that could arise when one single company controls most of the main developers for the biggest decentralised and distributed cryptocurrency. There were a lot of unknowns but people seemed to give them the benefit of the doubt because they were apparently about to release some new software called "sidechains" that could offer some benefits to the network.
Not long after Blockstream came on the scene the issue of bitcoin's scalability once again came to forefront of the community. This issue came within the community a number of times since bitcoins inception. Bitcoin, as dictated in the code, cannot handle any more than around 3 transactions per second at the moment. To put that in perspective Paypal handles around 15 transactions per second on average and VISA handles something like 2000 transactions per second. The discussion in the community has been around how best to allow bitcoin to scale to allow a higher number of transactions in a given amount of time. I suggest that if anyone is interested in learning more about this problem from a technical angle, they go to btc and do a search. It's a complex issue but for many who have followed bitcoin for many years, the possible solutions seem relatively obvious. Essentially, currently the limit is put in place in just a few lines of code. This was not originally present when bitcoin was first released. It was in fact put in place afterwards as a measure to stop a bloating attack on the network. Because all bitcoin transactions have to be stored forever on the bitcoin network, someone could theoretically simply transmit a large number of transactions which would have to be stored by the entire network forever. When bitcoin was released, transactions were actually for free as the only people running the network were enthusiasts. In fact a single bitcoin did not even have any specific value so it would be impossible set a fee value. This meant that a malicious person could make the size of the bitcoin ledger grow very rapidly without much/any cost which would stop people from wanting to join the network due to the resource requirements needed to store it, which at the time would have been for very little gain.
Towards the end of the summer last year, this bitcoin scaling debate surfaced again as it was becoming clear that the transaction limit for bitcoin was semi regularly being reached and that it would not be long until it would be regularly hit and the network would become congested. This was a very serious issue for a currency. Bitcoin had made progress over the years to the point of retailers starting to offer it as a payment option. Bitcoin companies like, Microsoft, Paypal, Steam and many more had began to adopt it. If the transaction limit would be constantly maxed out, the network would become unreliable and slow for users. Users and businesses would not be able to make a reliable estimate when their transaction would be confirmed by the network.
Users, developers and businesses (which at the time was pretty much the only real bitcoin subreddit) started to discuss how we should solve the problem bitcoin. There was significant support from the users and businesses behind a simple solution put forward by the developer Gavin Andreesen. Gavin was the lead developer after Satoshi Nakamoto left bitcoin and he left it in his hands. Gavin initially proposed a very simple solution of increasing the limit which was to change the few lines of code to increase the maximum number of transactions that are allowed. For most of bitcoin's history the transaction limit had been set far far higher than the number of transactions that could potentially happen on the network. The concept of increasing the limit one time was based on the fact that history had proven that no issue had been cause by this in the past.
A certain group of bitcoin developers decided that increasing the limit by this amount was too much and that it was dangerous. They said that the increased use of resources that the network would use would create centralisation pressures which could destroy the network. The theory was that a miner of the network with more resources could publish many more transactions than a competing small miner could handle and therefore the network would tend towards few large miners rather than many small miners. The group of developers who supported this theory were all developers who worked for the company Blockstream. The argument from people in support of increasing the transaction capacity by this amount was that there are always inherent centralisation pressure with bitcoin mining. For example miners who can access the cheapest electricity will tend to succeed and that bigger miners will be able to find this cheaper electricity easier. Miners who have access to the most efficient computer chips will tend to succeed and that larger miners are more likely to be able to afford the development of them. The argument from Gavin and other who supported increasing the transaction capacity by this method are essentially there are economies of scale in mining and that these economies have far bigger centralisation pressures than increased resource cost for a larger number of transactions (up to the new limit proposed). For example, at the time the total size of the blockchain was around 50GB. Even for the cost of a 500GB SSD is only $150 and would last a number of years. This is in-comparison to the $100,000's in revenue per day a miner would be making.
Various developers put forth various other proposals, including Gavin Andresen who put forth a more conservative increase that would then continue to increase over time inline with technological improvements. Some of the employees of blockstream also put forth some proposals, but all were so conservative, it would take bitcoin many decades before it could reach a scale of VISA. Even though there was significant support from the community behind Gavin's simple proposal of increasing the limit it was becoming clear certain members of the bitcoin community who were part of Blockstream were starting to become increasingly vitriolic and divisive. Gavin then teamed up with one of the other main bitcoin developers Mike Hearn and released a coded (i.e. working) version of the bitcoin software that would only activate if it was supported by a significant majority of the network. What happened next was where things really started to get weird.
After this free and open source software was released, Theymos, the person who controls all the main communication channels for the bitcoin community implemented a new moderation policy that disallowed any discussion of this new software. Specifically, if people were to discuss this software, their comments would be deleted and ultimately they would be banned temporarily or permanently. This caused chaos within the community as there was very clear support for this software at the time and it seemed our best hope for finally solving the problem and moving on. Instead a censorship campaign was started. At first it 'all' they were doing was banning and removing discussions but after a while it turned into actively manipulating the discussion. For example, if a thread was created where there was positive sentiment for increasing the transaction capacity or being negative about the moderation policies or negative about the actions of certain bitcoin developers, the mods of bitcoin would selectively change the sorting order of threads to 'controversial' so that the most support opinions would be sorted to the bottom of the thread and the most vitriolic would be sorted to the top of the thread. This was initially very transparent as it was possible to see that the most downvoted comments were at the top and some of the most upvoted were at the bottom. So they then implemented hiding the voting scores next to the users name. This made impossible to work out the sentiment of the community and when combined with selectively setting the sorting order to controversial it was possible control what information users were seeing. Also, due to the very very large number of removed comments and users it was becoming obvious the scale of censorship going on. To hide this they implemented code in their CSS for the sub that completely hid comments that they had removed so that the censorship itself was hidden. Anyone in support of scaling bitcoin were removed from the main communication channels. Theymos even proudly announced that he didn't care if he had to remove 90% of the users. He also later acknowledged that he knew he had the ability to block support of this software using the control he had over the communication channels.
While this was all going on, Blockstream and it's employees started lobbying the community by paying for conferences about scaling bitcoin, but with the very very strange rule that no decisions could be made and no complete solutions could be proposed. These conferences were likely strategically (and successfully) created to stunt support for the scaling software Gavin and Mike had released by forcing the community to take a "lets wait and see what comes from the conferences" kind of approach. Since no final solutions were allowed at these conferences, they only served to hinder and splinter the communities efforts to find a solution. As the software Gavin and Mike released called BitcoinXT gained support it started to be attacked. Users of the software were attack by DDOS. Employees of Blockstream were recommending attacks against the software, such as faking support for it, to only then drop support at the last moment to put the network in disarray. Blockstream employees were also publicly talking about suing Gavin and Mike from various different angles simply for releasing this open source software that no one was forced to run. In the end Mike Hearn decided to leave due to the way many members of the bitcoin community had treated him. This was due to the massive disinformation campaign against him on bitcoin. One of the many tactics that are used against anyone who does not support Blockstream and the bitcoin developers who work for them is that you will be targeted in a smear campaign. This has happened to a number of individuals and companies who showed support for scaling bitcoin. Theymos has threatened companies that he will ban any discussion of them on the communication channels he controls (i.e. all the main ones) for simply running software that he disagrees with (i.e. any software that scales bitcoin).
As time passed, more and more proposals were offered, all against the backdrop of ever increasing censorship in the main bitcoin communication channels. It finally come down the smallest and most conservative solution. This solution was much smaller than even the employees of Blockstream had proposed months earlier. As usual there was enormous attacks from all sides and the most vocal opponents were the employees of Blockstream. These attacks still are ongoing today. As this software started to gain support, Blockstream organised more meetings, especially with the biggest bitcoin miners and made a pact with them. They promised that they would release code that would offer an on-chain scaling solution hardfork within about 4 months, but if the miners wanted this they would have to commit to running their software and only their software. The miners agreed and the ended up not running the most conservative proposal possible. This was in February last year. There is no hardfork proposal in sight from the people who agreed to this pact and bitcoin is still stuck with the exact same transaction limit it has had since the limit was put in place about 6 years ago. Gavin has also been publicly smeared by the developers at Blockstream and a plot was made against him to have him removed from the development team. Gavin has now been, for all intents an purposes, expelled from bitcoin development. This has meant that all control of bitcoin development is in the hands of the developers working at Blockstream.
There is a new proposal that offers a market based approach to scaling bitcoin. This essentially lets the market decide. Of course, as usual there has been attacks against it, and verbal attacks from the employees of Blockstream. This has the biggest chance of gaining wide support and solving the problem for good.
To give you an idea of Blockstream; It has hired most of the main and active bitcoin developers and is now synonymous with the "Core" bitcoin development team. They AFAIK no products at all. They have received around $75m in funding. Every single thing they do is supported by theymos. They have started implementing an entirely new economic system for bitcoin against the will of it's users and have blocked any and all attempts to scaling the network in line with the original vision.
Although this comment is ridiculously long, it really only covers the tip of the iceberg. You could write a book on the last two years of bitcoin. The things that have been going on have been mind blowing. One last thing that I think is worth talking about is the u/bashco's claim of vote manipulation.
The users that the video talks about have very very large numbers of downvotes mostly due to them having a very very high chance of being astroturfers. Around about the same time last year when Blockstream came active on the scene every single bitcoin troll disappeared, and I mean literally every single one. In the years before that there were a large number of active anti-bitcoin trolls. They even have an active sub buttcoin. Up until last year you could go down to the bottom of pretty much any thread in bitcoin and see many of the usual trolls who were heavily downvoted for saying something along the lines of "bitcoin is shit", "You guys and your tulips" etc. But suddenly last year they all disappeared. Instead a new type of bitcoin user appeared. Someone who said they were fully in support of bitcoin but they just so happened to support every single thing Blockstream and its employees said and did. They had the exact same tone as the trolls who had disappeared. Their way to talking to people was aggressive, they'd call people names, they had a relatively poor understanding of how bitcoin fundamentally worked. They were extremely argumentative. These users are the majority of the list of that video. When the 10's of thousands of users were censored and expelled from bitcoin they ended up congregating in btc. The strange thing was that the users listed in that video also moved over to btc and spend all day everyday posting troll-like comments and misinformation. Naturally they get heavily downvoted by the real users in btc. They spend their time constantly causing as much drama as possible. At every opportunity they scream about "censorship" in btc while they are happy about the censorship in bitcoin. These people are astroturfers. What someone somewhere worked out, is that all you have to do to take down a community is say that you are on their side. It is an astoundingly effective form of psychological attack.
submitted by CuriousTitmouse to btc [link] [comments]

Who is Actually Behind Bitcoin? Bitcoin and Altcoin Weekly Review and Market Forecast: 2020.07.13 - 07.19 Lorien Gamaroff: CentBee works to make Bitcoin SV 'palatable' Building Cross-Platform Apps with Flutter  RaisedButton - 2  Pon Rahul  PATTARAI Steve Shadders: Bitcoin development approaching exponential payoff

Bitcoin is free software and any developer can contribute to the project. Everything you need is in the GitHub repository.Please make sure to read and follow the development process described in the README, as well as to provide good quality code and respect all guidelines. Amiti Uttarwar is pushing bitcoin development forward with a focus on privacy and accessibility. She just so happens to also be the first confirmed female to do so. The engineering team was An experienced bitcoin MLM software development company can help you find the fraud. It reveals the real transactions. It reveals the real transactions. It is a good reason to use Bitcoin.If you are an online trader or network dealer, it applies to you more. Development Team. The Bitcoin SV team has been assembled with a view to realizing industry best practices, in order to deliver and maintain a full-node implementation with an unprecedented commitment to quality assurance and stability. The Lead Developer is Daniel Connolly, who joined nChain after 20 years in enterprise systems and held senior Development Platform; Another aspect that requires your attention before the developing process is, the app development platform. There most basic and most preferred blockchain platforms are Quorum, Hyperledger, and BigChainDB, which helps in the development of the bitcoin app with ease.

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Who is Actually Behind Bitcoin?

Hi I am Masa Keith Nakatsu, Founder and Ex CEO of Orb ( founded 2014 and acquired by SBI Holdings in 2018 ) , Lead Mentor for Google Global Accelerator Program, and EIR at OIST. I am serial tech ... The continued development of Bitcoin SV sits largely on the shoulders of men like Steve Shadders, chief technology officer at nChain, and his team. Steve Shadders joined our Becky Liggero to talk ... Q&A with the Bitcoin SV Development Team - Duration: 1:14:34. Bitcoin and Beyond 1,955 views. 1:14:34. How To Speak by Patrick Winston - Duration: 1:03:43. MIT OpenCourseWare Recommended for you. The first meeting of Team Development 2020 group. The first meeting of Team Development 2020 group. Skip navigation ... Grow Your Bitcoin - Zoom Presentation 1 July 2020 - Duration: 37:30. Bill Barhydt, CEO and founder of the Abra digital finance wallet and exchange app, said he sees Bitcoin’s ( BTC ) blockchain struggling when it comes to on-chain mass adoption of the asset as a ...

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